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Complaints grow in China against Tesla autos

Complaints grow in China against Tesla autos

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
AFP |
12:09 PM

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Electric carmaker Tesla is facing a backlash in China just as local competitors seek to challenge the US-based company’s share of the Asian giant’s market.

China’s market watchdog agency and its consumer protection agency issued statements Wednesday referencing an incident at the Shanghai Auto Show that went viral on Chinese social media.

At the show a woman climbed on top of a car Monday and yelled that she was almost killed when the brakes on her Tesla failed. She wore a t-shirt emblazoned with the Tesla logo and the words “brake failure”.

The woman was eventually wrestled to the ground by plain clothes security guards, but not before several onlookers as well as a reporter from state-affiliated Global Times took video of the incident and posted it online.

Shanghai police jailed the woman for five days for disrupting the peace, but her message nevertheless gained traction.

“A Tesla owner who recently defended her rights at the Shanghai Auto Show has aroused widespread concern,” China’s market watchdog agency said in a statement.

The agency said it “attaches great importance to that”, adding that it instructed local officials “to protect the legitimate rights and interests of consumers in accordance with the law”.

The office emphasized that companies “should effectively fulfill their main responsibility for quality and safety.”

The China Consumers Association also joined the backlash, stating that it is “highly concerned” about the incident.

“In the face of consumer complaints, companies must listen carefully, negotiate sincerely, and give consumers reasonable explanations and effective solutions”, the group said.

Tesla said Tuesday that it would address any problem with its vehicles in a statement on Chinese social media platform Weibo but would not meet unreasonable customer demands.

State news service Xinhua published an opinion piece blasting the statement for its alleged “lack basic sincerity”.

The car company later issued a second, more conciliatory statement on Weibo.

Elon Musk’s company is the highest-selling EV brand globally and in China. The company built its third factory for electric vehicle in Shanghai in 2019 and is already selling one-fourth of its output in China.

The complaints come as Chinese firms including smartphone giants Huawei and Xiaomi, e-commerce leader Alibaba, and even DJI, the world’s top drone manufacturer, are entering the electric vehicle market.

China is the world’s biggest and most rapidly electrifying auto market. The government expects new-energy vehicles to comprise 25 percent of car sales by 2025.

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/complaints-grow-china-against-tesla-212548589.html

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Complaints grow in China against Tesla autos

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
AFP |
10:25 AM

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Electric carmaker Tesla is facing a backlash in China just as local competitors seek to challenge the US-based company’s share of the Asian giant’s market.

China’s market watchdog agency and its consumer protection agency issued statements Wednesday referencing an incident at the Shanghai Auto Show that went viral on Chinese social media.

At the show a woman climbed on top of a car Monday and yelled that she was almost killed when the brakes on her Tesla failed. She wore a t-shirt emblazoned with the Tesla logo and the words “brake failure”.

The woman was eventually wrestled to the ground by plain clothes security guards, but not before several onlookers as well as a reporter from state-affiliated Global Times took video of the incident and posted it online.

Shanghai police jailed the woman for five days for disrupting the peace, but her message nevertheless gained traction.

“A Tesla owner who recently defended her rights at the Shanghai Auto Show has aroused widespread concern,” China’s market watchdog agency said in a statement.

The agency said it “attaches great importance to that”, adding that it instructed local officials “to protect the legitimate rights and interests of consumers in accordance with the law”.

The office emphasized that companies “should effectively fulfill their main responsibility for quality and safety.”

The China Consumers Association also joined the backlash, stating that it is “highly concerned” about the incident.

“In the face of consumer complaints, companies must listen carefully, negotiate sincerely, and give consumers reasonable explanations and effective solutions”, the group said.

Tesla said Tuesday that it would address any problem with its vehicles in a statement on Chinese social media platform Weibo but would not meet unreasonable customer demands.

State news service Xinhua published an opinion piece blasting the statement for its alleged “lack basic sincerity”.

The car company later issued a second, more conciliatory statement on Weibo.

Elon Musk’s company is the highest-selling EV brand globally and in China. The company built its third factory for electric vehicle in Shanghai in 2019 and is already selling one-fourth of its output in China.

The complaints come as Chinese firms including smartphone giants Huawei and Xiaomi, e-commerce leader Alibaba, and even DJI, the world’s top drone manufacturer, are entering the electric vehicle market.

China is the world’s biggest and most rapidly electrifying auto market. The government expects new-energy vehicles to comprise 25 percent of car sales by 2025.

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/complaints-grow-china-against-tesla-212548589.html

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Canada judge adjourns Huawei exec’s extradition hearing to August

Canada judge adjourns Huawei exec’s extradition hearing to August

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
AFP |
10:22 AM

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A Canadian judge on Wednesday adjourned Chinese Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou’s extradition hearing until August, giving her team time to review newly obtained documents from investment bank HSBC they say are key to her defense.

The delay requested by Meng upends the scheduled resumption on Monday of the British Columbia Supreme Court proceedings, which were to last three weeks and be the final leg of her two-and-a-half-year legal fight to forestall being sent to the United States to face charges of bank fraud.

“This application has been granted,” Associate Chief Justice Heather Holmes told the court. “The remainder of the proceedings… will be rescheduled to begin on or around August 3, 2021.”

She added that her reasons for the ruling would be released in writing next week.

Meng, the daughter of the company’s founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei, is accused by US prosecutors of misrepresenting to HSBC links between Huawei and a company that sold telecoms equipment to Iran in violation of US sanctions.

She has denied hiding Huawei’s relationship with Skycom, a former subsidiary, from HSBC.

Earlier this month Huawei said it had reached an agreement with HSBC in Hong Kong to secure the documents. The company had previously failed to get the documents from a court in the UK, where HSBC is headquartered.

According to the original Huawei summons, seen by AFP, Meng was seeking HSBC bank documents on compliance, sanctions and risk evaluation, as well as records linked to a PowerPoint presentation she made to HSBC executives at a Hong Kong tea house in a bid to secure loans.

Unreasonable request

Wednesday’s British Columbia Supreme Court decision is a small but key victory for Meng.

The delay, however, will come as little relief to the families of two Canadians jailed in China for what prime minister Justin Trudeau has said are “trumped-up” espionage charges.

The pair, former diplomat Michael Kovrig and businessperson Michael Spavor, were detained nine days after Meng’s December 2018 arrest during a Vancouver stopover, in apparent retaliation.

Their detention and Meng’s extradition battle has plunged Canada-China relations into a deep freeze.

On Monday, Meng’s lawyers petitioned the court for an adjournment to provide Meng the opportunity to review the HSBC documents for possible “relevant evidence” in her extradition case.

Lawyers for the Canadian government, acting on behalf of the United States, opposed the request, saying it was an effort to inappropriately stretch out the case, and that her arguments belong only before a US trial judge.

“They are requesting this court be turned into a trial court,” government lawyer Robert Frater shot back. “This is an unreasonable request because it is not based on anything but unsubstantiated, redacted allegations.”

Meng remains under night-time house arrest in her Vancouver mansion, supervised by guards at all times, and required to wear a wireless tracking device.

The case was supposed to have wrapped up May 14, barring any appeals, but the adjournment means it will not finish until at least the end of August.

“Any additional applications arising from the documents Meng will be receiving from HSBC will need to have been made and determined before (August),” Holmes also ruled.

https://www.barrons.com/news/canada-judge-adjourns-huawei-exec-s-extradition-hearing-to-august-01619038214

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Deadly blast at Pakistan hotel hosting China ambassador: official

Deadly blast at Pakistan hotel hosting China ambassador: official

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
AFP |
10:21 AM

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At least four people were killed and a dozen others wounded when a bomb exploded at a top hotel hosting the Chinese ambassador in southwestern Pakistan, officials said late Wednesday.

The blast took place in the car park of the Serena a luxury hotel chain throughout Pakistan in the city of Quetta, the capital of Balochistan province where the military has been fighting a decade-long low level insurgency.

“At least four people have been killed and 12 others were injured,” Pakistan’s interior minister Sheikh Rashid Ahmed told AFP, describing it as “an act of terrorism”.

“A Chinese delegation of around four people led by the ambassador was lodging in the hotel.

“The ambassador was out for a meeting when the explosion took place,” he added.

Balochistan is poor despite its natural resources a source of great anger to residents who complain they do not receive a fair share of the gas and mineral wealth.

Resentment has been fuelled by billions of dollars of Chinese money flowing into the region through the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) a key part of China’s Belt and Road Initiative which locals say gave them little benefit as most new jobs went to outsiders.

Azhar Ikram, a senior police official in the city, confirmed the death toll and said that the Chinese ambassador was staying at the hotel, but was not present at the time of the blast.

“Initial probe suggests it was an IED planted in one of the vehicles,” Ikram said.

No group immediately claimed the attack.

In 2019 gunmen stormed a luxury hotel overlooking a flagship CPEC project the deep-water seaport in Gwadar that gives China strategic access to the Arabian Sea killing at least eight people.

And in June, Baloch insurgents targeted the Pakistan Stock Exchange, which is partly owned by Chinese companies.

All the attacks were claimed by the Balochistan Liberation Army.

It comes after more than a week of violent anti-France protests led by an extremist party based in the eastern city of Lahore.

https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20210421-deadly-blast-at-pakistan-hotel-hosting-china-ambassador-official

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Sri Lanka expels ship carrying nuclear material for China

Sri Lanka expels ship carrying nuclear material for China

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
AFP |
10:15 AM

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Sri Lankan authorities on Wednesday expelled an Antigua-registered ship that entered the island’s territory without declaring a radioactive cargo bound for China.

The country’s Atomic Energy Regulatory Council said the MV BBC Naples was asked to leave after it was found to be in the Chinese-run port of Hambantota on Tuesday night carrying uranium hexafluoride.

“The ship failed to declare its dangerous cargo uranium hexafluoride and we decided to order it to leave our waters immediately,” council director general Anil Ranjith told AFP.

The ship had come from Rotterdam but authorities did not say where in China it was headed.

Ranjith said it was an offence to enter a port without declaring the material, which is used to enrich uranium, the fuel for nuclear power stations and weapons.

Sri Lanka’s opposition leader Sajith Premadasa demanded an investigation into the incident, describing it as a serious safety threat.

“The navy has not been allowed to board the vessel to carry out an inspection,” Premadasa said.

There was no immediate comment from the government.

Hambantota port was leased to China in 2017 for 99 years after the Colombo government was unable to repay $1.4 million it had borrowed from Beijing to build it.

Hambantota, about 260 kilometres (162 miles) south of Colombo, is near key Indian Ocean shipping lanes.

The entry of two Chinese submarines into Colombo in 2014 angered neighbouring India, the traditional regional power which is competing with Beijing for influence in the Indian Ocean.

Since then, Sri Lanka has not allowed Chinese submarine visits.

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/sri-lanka-expels-ship-carrying-133136758.html

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US lawmakers intensify bipartisan efforts to counter China

US lawmakers intensify bipartisan efforts to counter China

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
Reuters |
10:12 AM

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A bipartisan US congressional push to counteract China picked up steam on Wednesday as a Senate committee overwhelmingly backed a bill pressing Beijing on human rights and economic competition and other lawmakers introduced a measure seeking billions for technology research.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee backed the “Strategic Competition Act of 2021″ by 21-1, sending the bill for consideration by the 100-member Senate, even as committee members voiced a need to do even more to counteract Beijing.

The committee added dozens of amendments to the bill. One would force a boycott of the 2022 Beijing Olympics by US officials, not athletes, which was also recommended by the US Commission on Religious Freedom.

Separately, a group of Senate and House of Representatives lawmakers introduced the “Endless Frontier Act,” calling for $100 billion over five years for basic and advanced technology research and $10 billion to create new “technology hubs” across the country.

Both bills have strong support from both political parties and are expected to eventually become law. The desire for a hard line in dealings with China is one of the few truly bipartisan sentiments in the deeply divided US Congress, which is narrowly controlled by President Joe Biden’s fellow Democrats.

The Biden administration supports the measures.

“With this overwhelming bipartisan vote, the Strategic Competition Act becomes the first of what we hope will be a cascade of legislative activity for our nation to finally meet the China challenge across every dimension of power, political, diplomatic, economic, innovation, military and even cultural,” said Senator Bob Menendez, the Democratic chair of the Senate panel.

He and Senator Jim Risch, the panel’s top Republican, wrote the “Strategic Competition” measure together, with Risch saying it was “truly bipartisan.”

HUMAN RIGHTS AND MILITARY SPENDING

The 280-page Senate bill addresses competition with China through efforts such as increasing international development funding and working with allied countries and international organisations. It pushes humanitarian and democratic values, like imposing sanctions over the treatment of the minority Muslim Uighurs and supporting democracy in Hong Kong.

The bill stresses the need to “prioritise the military investments necessary to achieve United States political objectives in the Indo-Pacific.” It backs steep increases in security-related funding for the region and closer ties with Taiwan.

It would expand the scope of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), which scrutinises financial transactions for potential national security risks. US universities are concerned about a provision of the bill requiring CFIUS to review some Chinese grants and contracts.

The Strategic Competition and Endless Frontier acts are part of a fast-track effort announced in February by Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to pass a wide range of legislation to counter China. Schumer is a lead sponsor of the Endless Frontier bill.

Foreign Relations committee members said they want to do more.

“I don’t believe anyone would think that this legislation is going to change China’s march toward a global hegemony of autocracy and repression,” Republican Senator Mitt Romney said. “…I would suggest we have a lot more work to do.”

Eric Sayers, who studies technology policy and US defense strategy in the Asia-Pacific at the conservative-leaning American Enterprise Institute, called the legislation an important part of efforts to address challenges posed by China.

The proposed spending builds on earlier legislation “taking a bold step in the technology competition with China through investing in our domestic competitiveness and building new resilience in our supply chains,” Sayers said.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-china-senate/u-s-lawmakers-intensify-bipartisan-efforts-to-counter-china-idINKBN2C81B8?edition-redirect=in

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EU seeks global standards for AI, civil rights groups fret

EU seeks global standards for AI, civil rights groups fret

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
Reuters |
10:10 AM

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The European Commission on Wednesday announced tough draft rules on the use of artificial intelligence, including a ban on most surveillance, in an attempt to set global standards for a key technology dominated by China and the United States.

Civil rights groups, however, warned that loopholes in the proposal, which envisage hefty fines for violations and set strict safeguards for high-risk applications, could leave room for abuse of the technology by repressive governments.

China is moving ahead in the AI race, while the COVID-19 pandemic has underlined the importance of algorithms and internet-connected gadgets in daily life.

“On artificial intelligence, trust is a must, not a nice to have. With these landmark rules, the EU is spearheading the development of new global norms to make sure AI can be trusted,” European tech chief Margrethe Vestager said in a statement.

European Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager and European Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton give a media conference on the EU approach to Artificial Intelligence following weekly meeting of EU Commission in Brussels, Belgium, April 21, 2021. (REUTERS/Olivier Hoslet)

European Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager and European Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton give a media conference on the EU approach to Artificial Intelligence following weekly meeting of EU Commission in Brussels, Belgium, April 21, 2021. (REUTERS/Olivier Hoslet)

The Commission said AI applications that allow governments to do social scoring or exploit children will be banned.

High risk AI applications used in recruitment, critical infrastructure, credit scoring, migration and law enforcement will be subject to strict safeguards.

Companies breaching the rules face fines of up to 6 percent of their global turnover or 30 million euros ($36 million), whichever is the higher figure.

European industrial chief Thierry Breton said the rules are aimed at dispelling myths and misconceptions about AI.

“Behind the term artificial intelligence, there are popular beliefs and fears that have long been conveyed by the film industry,” Breton told a news conference.

“It is true that the little robot (Walt Disney animated film character) WALL-E could unfortunately not make us forget the T-800 (robot) from Terminator. Therefore, we must navigate between all of this and not stigmatise technology,” he said.

Tech lobbying group CCIA said the rules should not create more red tape for companies and users.

“AI will be key for Europe’s economic recovery and future competitiveness. However, regulation alone will not make the EU a leader in AI,” CCIA vice President Christian Borggreen said.

European Digital Rights pointed to worrying gaps in the proposal.

“The draft law does not prohibit the full extent of unacceptable uses of AI and in particular all forms of biometric mass surveillance. This leaves a worrying gap for discriminatory and surveillance technologies used by governments and companies,” Sarah Chander at the lobbying group said.

Greens party lawmaker at the European Parliament Patrick Breyer was also scathing of the proposal.

“Biometric and mass surveillance, profiling and behavioural prediction technology in our public spaces undermines our freedoms and threatens our open societies. The proposed procedural requirements are a mere smokescreen,” he said.

The Commission will have to thrash out the details with EU national governments and the European Parliament before the rules can come into force.

That could take years marked by intense lobbying from companies and even foreign governments, said Patrick Van Eecke, partner and head of the European cyber practice at law firm Cooley.

($1 = 0.8333 euros)

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-tech-artificialintelligence/eu-seeks-global-standards-for-ai-civil-rights-groups-fret-idINKBN2C81E0

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Australia says it cancelled state deals on China’s Belt and Road over ‘national interest’

Australia says it cancelled state deals on China’s Belt and Road over ‘national interest’

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
Reuters |
10:02 AM

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Australia said a decision to cancel two deals between Victoria state and China on the Belt and Road Initiative was about ensuring consistency in foreign relations and was not aimed at any country.

The Chinese embassy earlier criticised the move by Foreign minister Marise Payne to veto two framework agreements signed by Victoria state as “provocative” and said it would further damage ties with Australia.

Payne said on radio on Thursday she had received a thousand notifications from the states about deals they had with multiple foreign governments, under a new process that gives her veto over such arrangements.

“This scheme is very focussed on Australia’s national interest. Its about ensuring consistency of our foreign relations across Australia and it’s most certainly not aimed at any one country,” she told ABC radio’s AM programme.

Australia's Foreign Minister Marise Payne speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Department of State following the 30th AUSMIN in Washington, D.C. July 28, 2020. (REUTERS/Brendan Smialowski)

Australia’s Foreign Minister Marise Payne speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Department of State following the 30th AUSMIN in Washington, D.C. July 28, 2020. (REUTERS/Brendan Smialowski)

Beijing had been notified of the decision before it was made public on Wednesday evening.

She added Australia was committed to engaging with China, and was “asking all goverments around the world to respect our government’s decision-making authority”.

Australia’s conservative coalition government had declined to agree to a country-level MOU with China on the Belt and Road Initiative. But Victoria Labour Premier Dan Andrews signed an agreement to promote the infrastructure development initiative in 2018 and 2019,saying it would bring Chinese investment to his state.

The Chinese embassy said in a statement the cancellation was “another unreasonable and provocative move taken by the Australian side against China”.

Diplomatic relations between Australia and China have worsened since Canberra called for an international inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus, prompting trade reprisals from Beijing.

On Wednesday, a senior Chinese embassy official again criticised Australia’s move to effectively ban Chinese telecommunications company Huawei from its 5G network in 2018, the first country to do so, saying Canberra had “even persuaded others to follow suit”.

Payne is visiting New Zealand, where she will meet her counterpart Nanaia Mahuta. Mahuta on Monday said New Zealand did not support the Five Eyes security alliance which also includes Australia, Britain, Canada and the United States speaking out on human rights issues.

The comments were widely interpreted as referring to Five Eyes joint statements criticising China.

“Australia will continue to emphasize the vital nature of the Five Eyes in security and intelligence,” Payne said on Thursday.

https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/australia-says-it-cancelled-state-deals-chinas-belt-road-over-national-interest-2021-04-22/

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China’s health regulator looks into allegation cancer doctor gave pricier, substandard treatment and let patient die prematurely

China’s health regulator looks into allegation cancer doctor gave pricier, substandard treatment and let patient die prematurely

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
South China Morning Post |
8:44 AM

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China’s top health regulator is investigating allegations an oncologist at a leading Shanghai hospital intentionally used more expensive, substandard treatment options for a cancer patient that led to his early death.

Lu Wei, an expert on gastrointestinal cancer at Shanghai’s Xinhua Hospital, has been under investigation after accusations made by another oncologist in Beijing, said the hospital on Tuesday.

The hospital is working with the National Health Commission in a probe into claims of cancer patients’ “losing both money and life”, allegedly due to their doctors’ greed and lack of professional knowledge after Zhang Yu from the Beijing-based Peking University Third Hospital made the dramatic accusations online, a senior publicity official from Lu’s hospital told the South China Morning Post.

Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team.

“We have been very serious about the case and doctor Lu has been suspended from duty to cooperate with the investigation,” said an official surnamed Shi from Xinhua Hospital.

Zhang Yu said that he had come across a case where a patient received poor treatment that not only pushed up medical costs but also caused them physical pain and early death.

On Monday the National Health Commission said in a statement that it had opened an inquiry into Zhang’s claims and said it would “never tolerate” such misconduct.

Over 3 million Chinese people died of cancer last year while 4.57 million new cancer patients were diagnosed in China. Globally 9.96 million people died of cancer last year in total, according to the latest data from the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

China accounts for nearly 24 per cent of total new global cases and 30 per cent of deaths, yet China’s population is equivalent to about 18 per cent of the total world population.

Although most of the cases in China were discovered at an advanced stage, Zhang blamed the high death rate partly on improper therapies that he claimed in some cases were deliberately designed by doctors to get more commission payments.

In a series of posts on Zhihu, China’s Quora-like social media platform, since early this month, he has specifically condemned a Shanghai-based oncologist named Lu Wei, whose treatment of one of his cancer patients allegedly cost the family more than 10 times what standard treatments should, and allegedly caused the patient to die earlier than normally expected.

He said Lu was not the only case he knew of. Over the past year, he said had come across more than 100 cases in dozens of hospitals across China where cancer patients received “inappropriate or simply wrong” treatment.

The unnamed patient, who suffered from advanced stomach cancer, turned to Zhang in October last year with an inquiry, Zhang said.

Prior to that, he had been treated by Lu, a cancer specialist at Xinhua Hospital in Shanghai, since July, but the expensive treatment options, including a controversial technique called NeuroKinetic Therapy that was banned from clinical use and excluded from the public health insurance, turned out to be ineffective and left his family in debt, he said.

Lu has not replied to the Post’s request for comment.

However, Lu has been removed from the list of experts at both the hospital’s website and its online appointment platform.

From the patient’s medical records and a handwritten chemotherapy note by Lu, Zhang said the patient was given expensive tests and medicine that he believed were “totally ineffective”. The man died at the beginning of this year.

The man’s daughter, who went by the nickname “Rong San Sui Ya” on Zhihu, has confirmed Zhang’s claims.

“I had taken my father to doctors around the country before getting him treated at the Xinhua Hospital in Shanghai. It was less than half a year later that he passed away. We spent all our savings and are now heavily in debt,” she wrote in a post earlier this month.

Several specialists invited by Ding Xiang Yuan, a respected online community for healthcare professionals, to discuss the case later also said most of Lu’s options were unreasonable.

“I only named Lu not because there are no other cases — in fact, I think there are worse ones — but because I don’t have enough evidence and I’m under great pressure. I have my job and family… The more doctors I offend the bigger the pressure is,” Zhang wrote in his latest post over the weekend.

The Post has approached both Zhang and Rong San Sui Ya for comment, but Zhang said he was “not allowed to comment”, while the other did not respond.

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/china-health-regulator-looks-allegation-020753855.html

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China’s Xi calls for fairer world order as rivalry with US deepens

China’s Xi calls for fairer world order as rivalry with US deepens

22-Apr-2021 Intellasia |
Reuters |
8:42 AM

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Chinese President Xi Jinping on Tuesday called for a rejection of hegemonic power structures in global governance, amid growing tensions between Washington and Beijing over a widening range of issues including alleged human rights abuses.

Speaking at the annual Boao Forum for Asia, Xi criticised efforts by some countries to “build barriers” and “decouple”, which he said would harm others and benefit no one.

China has long called for reforms of the global governance system to better reflect a more diverse range of perspectives and values from the international community, including its own, instead of those of a few major nations.

It has also repeatedly clashed with the biggest stakeholders in world governance, particularly the United States, over a range of issues from human rights to China’s economic influence over other countries.

“The world wants justice, not hegemony,” Xi said in remarks broadcast to the forum.

“A big country should look like a big country by showing that it is shouldering more responsibility,” he said.

While Xi did not identify any country in his remarks, Chinese officials have in recent times referred to US “hegemony” in public criticisms of Washington’s global projection of power in trade and geopolitics.

On Friday, US President Joe Biden held his first face-to-face White House summit since taking office, in a meeting with Japanese prime minister Yoshihide Suga in which China topped the agenda.

Both leaders said they “share serious concerns” about the human rights situation in Hong Kong and China’s Xinjiang region, where Washington has said Beijing is perpetrating a genocide against Muslim Uighurs. China has denied abuses.

In a display of economic cooperation to the exclusion of China, Biden said Japan and the United States would jointly invest in areas such as 5G technology, artificial intelligence, quantum computing, genomics and semiconductor supply chains.

As the Biden administration rallies other democratic allies to harden their stance on China, Beijing is seeking to strengthen ties with its autocratic partners and economically dependent neighbours in Southeast Asia.

Chinese speakers at the Boao forum, Asia’s answer to Davos, also affirmed Beijing’s commitment to global free trade.

China’s trade practices were a focus of an intense tariff war between Beijing and Washington under the Trump administration, with the United States accusing Beijing of unfair subsidiaries that give Chinese companies unfair advantage abroad and forced transfers of technology and intellectual property.

“The biggest experience that China’s accession to the World Trade Organisation 20 years ago is that we Chinese are not afraid of competition,” Long Yongtu,China’s former chief negotiator for the China’s WTO entry in 2001, told the forum on Monday.

SHARED INTERESTS

However, despite the persistent confrontation between the US administration and China, both sides have rediscovered a common interest in battling climate change, after bilateral talks on fighting greenhouse emissions fizzled out during the Trump era.

Last week, US climate envoy John Kerry flew to Shanghai to meet with his Chinese counterpart in the first high-level visit to China by a Biden administration official.

Both agreed on concrete actions “in the 2020s” to reduce emissions.

https://www.reuters.com/world/china/chinas-president-xi-says-global-governance-system-should-be-more-equitable-fair-2021-04-20/

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