210516101346 screengrab rochelle walensky cnn tv 0516 super 169 captis executive search management consulting leadership board services

CDC chief on mask wearing: Unvaccinated people need to be honest with themselves

210516101346 screengrab rochelle walensky cnn tv 0516 super tease captis executive search management consulting leadership board services
The CDC last week updated its guidance for people fully vaccinated against Covid-19 to say they generally do not need to wear a mask, except in certain circumstances. The updated guidance also says people still need to wear masks if they’re unvaccinated, including people younger than 12.
“I think that people who were not inclined to wear a mask were not inclined to wear a mask before Thursday,” Walensky told CNN’s Dana Bash on “State of the Union” when asked if she trusted that people would wear a mask if they were unvaccinated.
Some states, including California, are ending their mask mandates as they prepare to fully reopen.
“What we’re really asking in those settings, is to say, in terms of the honor system, people have to be honest with themselves,” Walensky said. “You’re protected if you’re vaccinated, you’re not if you’re not vaccinated.”
Everyone taking their masks off will be a slow process, she said, as not all communities are the same — with some having high levels of vaccinations and others still showing high case rates.
“I want to convey that we are not saying that everybody has to take off their mask if they’re vaccinated,” Walensky said. “It’s been 16 months that we’ve been telling people to mask and this is going to be a slow process.”
The CDC director said in an interview on ABC’s “This Week” that the agency is asking people to take their health into their own hands.
“We are asking people to take their health into their own hands, to get vaccinated, and if they don’t, then they continue to be at risk. For the unvaccinated, our policy has not changed,” she said. “We were going to get to a place in this pandemic where vaccinated people were going to be able to take off their mask. We’re lucky to be there with the science that we have, and now we have to take this foundational step that is completely based in science and understand what it means as we open the entire country.”
On Saturday, the CDC announced schools should continue masking and using other coronavirus prevention strategies for at least the rest of the 2020-2021 school year because most students won’t be fully vaccinated by the end of the year. The US Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization to Pfizer/BioNTech’s two-dose coronavirus vaccine for adolescents ages 12 to 15 last week, but children under 12 aren’t yet eligible to receive a Covid-19 vaccine in the United States.
Walensky told Bash the CDC will not be changing its guidance for the end of the school year but said the CDC is currently working to update its summer camp Covid-19 guidance, which still recommends social distancing and masking at all times, including when playing outdoor sports, with exceptions for things like eating and swimming.
“Most kids will not be vaccinated or fully vaccinated before the end of this year and we’re going to work on updating our school guidance,” Walensky said. “So much evolved just in this week, both with our guidance — with unmask if you’re vaccinated — as well as the eligibility of vaccination for 12 to 15 year olds. So yes, we do have to rapidly update our camp guidance and we’re working on that right now.”
210516123901 dr sanjay gupta reliable sources 5 16 2021 super 169 captis executive search management consulting leadership board services

Dr. Gupta: Here's how the media can help a return to normal

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Stelter: This Fox News data proves Liz Cheney right

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Most stock quote data provided by BATS. Market indices are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes. All times are ET. Disclaimer. Morningstar: Copyright 2018 Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Factset: FactSet Research Systems Inc.2018. All rights reserved. Chicago Mercantile Association: Certain market data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Dow Jones: The Dow Jones branded indices are proprietary to and are calculated, distributed and marketed by DJI Opco, a subsidiary of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC and have been licensed for use to S&P Opco, LLC and CNN. Standard & Poor’s and S&P are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC and Dow Jones is a registered trademark of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC. All content of the Dow Jones branded indices Copyright S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC 2018 and/or its affiliates.

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201102102900 us voting center 1031 super 169 captis executive search management consulting leadership board services

Analysis: Why Virginia's 2021 elections are a good 2022 tea leaf

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And while Virginia is just one state (or commonwealth), the outcome in these races could give us a real clue about where the national political environment stands heading into the 2022 midterms. If Republicans do well this year, it could be a good sign for them next year.
Virginia’s unique in that no person can serve as governor more than one term in a row. Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam must step down after this term, meaning the seat is open, and neither Youngskin nor whoever the Democrats choose as their candidate in next month’s primary (probably former Gov. Terry McAuliffe) will have a clear incumbency advantage.
That’s important because governor’s races without incumbents running can, on the whole, tell us a lot about the political environment, if we know how to put them in context.
When I say context, I mean knowing the political lean of the state. Most political observers view the Democrats as moderately favored to hold on to Virginia’s governor’s mansion because the commonwealth has seen a marked shift to the left in the last decade.
President Joe Biden won Virginia by 10 points in 2020, after Hillary Clinton won it by 5 points in 2016. No Republican has won a statewide race in Virginia since 2009.
Virginia is 5 points more Democratic than the nation, according to the last two presidential races (when giving more weight to the most recent one).
This means that if the Democrats win this year’s governor’s election by 5 points, it’s consistent with a national environment in which the two parties are on equal footing. For Republicans to be facing a better political environment than in 2020 (when Biden won by a little less than 5 points nationally and by 10 points in Virginia), they want to keep any defeat to single digits.
To see how the relationship between Virginia elections and next year’s federal elections has worked in the past, look at the last Virginia gubernatorial election in 2017.
The state was somewhat less Democratic heading into 2017 with a Democratic lean in presidential elections of a little more than 2 points. The Democrats won the governor’s race by a little less than 9 points, which meant the result was consistent with a national environment of Democrats ahead by about 6.5 points.
They would go on to win the national House vote the following year by 8.6 points — very close to the overperformance they had in Virginia.
Of course, any one race can be dependent on candidate quality and other factors. Governors’ races individually can be misleading (for example, Democrats winning the 2013 Virginia governor’s race before getting trounced in the 2014 midterms), and they’re best examined as a whole.
In the median cycle since 2002, the difference between how much Democrats outperformed their baseline in the average governor’s race without an incumbent and the national House vote has been just 1.6 points. In 2018, it was less than a point.
The fact that groups of elections can tell us more than any one individually is why we need to keep an eye on Virginia’s House of Delegates elections this year as well. Any one race’s eccentricities tend to get ironed out in the average. All 100 seats in the state’s lower legislative body are up for grabs.
Democrats beat the Republicans by about 9 points when you combined all the House of Delegate races in 2017. In other words, it pointed to a similarly strong national environment for the Democrats as the governor’s race did.
In 2013, however, the delegate races pointed in a different direction than the governor’s race. Republicans, who fielded a lot more candidates, did about 13 points better in the delegate races as a whole than would have been expected in a neutral political environment. Looking at just races where both parties ran candidates, it was closer to an 8 point overperformance by Republicans.
Republicans would go on to win the House of Representatives in 2014 by about 6 points and easily wrestle Senate control from the Democrats.
What this means for 2021 heading into 2022 is pretty simple. Democrats should do well in both the Virginia gubernatorial delegate races, if the political environment is in their favor. If they only barely win or lose in both, we’re probably looking at the usual midterm losses the party that controls the White House has.
190630172957 12 nyc pride 0630 super 169 captis executive search management consulting leadership board services

NYC Pride parade organizers ban the NYPD from its events until 2025

“NYC Pride seeks to create safer spaces for the LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC communities at a time when violence against marginalized groups, specifically BIPOC and trans communities, has continued to escalate,” Heritage of Pride, the nonprofit that plans NYC Pride events, said in a statement on Saturday.
“The sense of safety that law enforcement is meant to provide can instead be threatening, and at times dangerous, to those in our community who are most often targeted with excessive force and/or without reason. NYC Pride is unwilling to contribute in any way to creating an atmosphere of fear or harm for members of the community.”
LGBTQIA+ refers to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex and asexual groups, and BIPOC stands for Black, Indigenous and people of color.
Heritage of Pride said they are banning all correction and law enforcement exhibitors at NYC Pride events until 2025, when their participation will be reviewed further.
A man walks with NYPD (NYPD) officers as they take part in the 2019 World Pride NYC and Stonewall 50th LGBTQ Pride Parade in New York on June 30, 2019.A man walks with NYPD (NYPD) officers as they take part in the 2019 World Pride NYC and Stonewall 50th LGBTQ Pride Parade in New York on June 30, 2019.
Event organizers said they no longer require security and first response from the NYPD and will instead reallocate those services to “trained private security, community leaders, and volunteers,” the statement reads. Heritage of Pride said it will use NYPD first response and security “only when absolutely necessary” and “as mandated by city officials,” according to the statement.
Heritage of Pride spokesperson Dan Dimant told CNN on Saturday that the organization has worked with the NYPD for over 25 years.
“There’s always been aggression by law enforcement and it’s been an issue in the community for years,” said Dimant. “The events of last year, with protests over George Floyd, there have been a lot of run-ins with the NYPD, so we began to think long and hard about this decision.”
The announcement comes more than a month before the annual march, set for June 27 this year. The first Pride marches began in response to the 1969 Stonewall riots, when the NYPD raided a gay bar in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village at a time when police routinely harassed gay people and establishments.
Last year’s Pride — the 50th anniversary event — was canceled and held virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The theme for this year’s event is “The Fight Continues.” The first Pride was held a year after the Stonewall riots.
Anatomy of a Pride paradeAnatomy of a Pride parade
While details of the event are still being discussed with event organizers and New York City officials, Dimant said they expect to have an in-person component as well as a virtual presentation.
A spokesperson for the NYPD said the move to ban the NYPD from the events was “disheartening.”
“Our annual work to ensure a safe, enjoyable Pride season has been increasingly embraced by its participants. The idea of officers being excluded is disheartening and runs counter to our shared values of inclusion and tolerance,” Detective Denise Moroney said in a statement. “That said, we’ll still be there to ensure traffic safety and good order during this huge, complex event.”
The Gay Officers Action League, or GOAL, an organization that represents LGBTQIA+ NYPD officers, said that the event organizers were taking “the low road.”
“Heritage of Pride is well aware that the city would not allow a large scale event to occur without police presence. So their response to activist pressure is to take the low road by preventing their fellow community members from celebrating their identities and honoring the shared legacy of the Stonewall Riots,” GOAL President Brian Downey said in a statement on Friday.
200219151515 irs tax form stock super 169 captis executive search management consulting leadership board services

Tax Day is Monday. Here's everything you need to know about filing your 2020 taxes

Next Monday, May 17, is the official deadline for individuals to file their 2020 federal tax return, and in most instances their state tax return, too.
It’s a month later than usual, thanks to the pandemic. But the filing deadline’s not the only thing that’s changed. Many of the upheavals over the past year have caused other changes to your taxes. Due to the Covid crisis, there are plenty of new and revised provisions and important dates you will need to know about before filing your return this year.
Here are some of the most important ones.

Why May 17?

While the original filing and payment due date was April 15, the IRS has pushed the deadline to May 17 to give individual filers, tax preparers and the IRS itself more time to sort through the many changes affecting one’s 2020 taxes from the latest Covid relief package. As it is, the filing season started a few weeks late this year since the IRS had its hands full administering provisions, like stimulus checks, from prior Covid relief packages.
Unless you choose to file for an extension (see question below) you must file and pay any remaining federal income taxes you owe for 2020 by May 17.
That way, you will avoid being hit with any potential late filing or late payment penalties.
But if you do miss your filing or payment deadlines, you may be eligible for first-time penalty relief.
There are two exceptions to the new extended federal deadline.
The first applies to anyone who pays estimated taxes, including many small businesses. Your usual April 15 payment was still due on April 15.
The second applies to anyone living in Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, who were hit hard by the February storms. The IRS extended the federal tax deadline for residents in those states to June 15.

Do I also get more time to file my state taxes then?

In most instances.
Even though the IRS extended the federal filing deadline, it was up to individual states to set their own tax deadlines.
Tax penalties: Here's what to do if you can't pay your taxes this yearTax penalties: Here's what to do if you can't pay your taxes this year
And most have extended their filing deadlines to May 17 to align with the federal schedule. They include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.
Some states’ filing dates differ. They are Hawaii, April 20; Iowa, June 1; Maryland, July 15; and Oklahoma June 15, although technically that only applies to tax payments, whereas returns still had to be filed by April 15.
In Louisiana, the deadline is May 17, although residents living in federally declared disaster areas due to the February winter storm have until June 15.

Do I get more time to make contributions to my IRA and Health Savings Account?

Yes. You now have until May 17 to make 2020 contributions to your IRA, Roth IRA, Health Savings Account, Archer Medical Savings Account (Archer MSA), and Coverdell Education Savings Account (Coverdell ESA).

Can I file for an extension to file my 2020 return?

Yes. You may get an automatic five-month extension to file your 2020 federal income taxes, meaning they won’t be due until October 15. To do so, submit your request to the IRS by May 17.
But note that an extension to file is not an extension to pay what you owe. You still must pay any remaining federal taxes owed on your 2020 income by May 17, if you want to avoid a potential late payment penalty.
And if you’re owed a refund, taking longer to file your taxes means you will wait longer to get your refund.

When can I expect my refund?

Typically refunds are issued within 21 calendar days of the IRS receiving your return. The fastest way for you to receive yours is to file electronically and choose direct deposit, the IRS notes.
'The worst': Tax professionals sound off on the 2020 tax filing season'The worst': Tax professionals sound off on the 2020 tax filing season
But this year, there is an unusually large backlog of returns to be processed both from 2019 and 2020. As of April 22, there were more than 29 million returns being held for manual processing, according to National Taxpayer Advocate Erin Collins. So any refunds from that batch are likely to be delayed.
The IRS also has said it is taking longer to process mailed documents, such as paper tax returns, and correspondence related to one’s tax return — for instance, if the IRS requested more information or found an error in a filer’s calculations.
IRS Commissioner Rettig told lawmakers on April 13 that any returns going through the agency’s error resolution service are taking 10 to 14 days to process, up from the typical three to five days in a normal filing season.
To find out if your refund is being processed, you can check the IRS tool “Where’s My Refund?” either within 24 hours of when the agency indicates it has received your e-filed return or four weeks after you mailed in your paper return. But note the tool will not tell you if the IRS needs more information from you or when it plans to release your refund, Collins noted in a blog post.

Are my stimulus payments taxable?

No. The money is tax-free.
But some people who are eligible for the money didn’t receive the first two rounds of payments — primarily those whose 2019 income was higher than their 2020 income or people who did not file tax returns for 2019 or 2018. They will be able to receive the money owed them via their federal tax return so long as they claim the refundable Recovery Rebate Credit.
That credit will reduce your income tax liability dollar-for-dollar. And to the extent the credit exceeds your tax liability, you’ll get the remainder as a refund.
For more, see here and here.

Are my unemployment benefits taxable?

Yes, but for households with modified adjusted gross income below $150,000 last year, the first $10,200 in unemployment benefits for each taxpayer in a household will be exempt from federal income tax, thanks to a provision in the latest Covid relief package signed into law by President Joe Biden.
Living in one state and working remotely from another? You could owe income taxes in bothLiving in one state and working remotely from another? You could owe income taxes in both
Also, when figuring out whether you are eligible for the $10,200 exclusion, you do not have to count any income from your unemployment benefits as part of your calculations of modified AGI, according to Mark Luscombe, principal federal tax analyst at Wolters Kluwer Tax & Accounting.
For anyone who filed their tax return before the latest Covid relief package went into effect in mid-March, the IRS said there is no need to file an amended return unless the exclusion would make you newly eligible for more tax credits and deductions that were not claimed on your original return. Otherwise, the agency said it will refigure your taxes by incorporating the $10,200 exclusion and either refund you any resulting overpayment or apply it to other taxes you owe.
Of course, if you live in a state with an income tax that also taxed unemployment compensation, you also should check your state revenue department’s web site to see if your state has decided to follow the IRS and exclude the first $10,200 from state income tax as well.
Whether or not you qualify for the $10,200 exclusion, note that most unemployment compensation is treated as taxable income, both by the IRS and by most states. (The exceptions are Alabama, Alaska, California, Florida, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.)
If you didn’t opt to have any income tax withheld from your unemployment payments during the year, the full tax bite will be assessed when you file your return.
But if your 2020 income was very low because you didn’t work for a big chunk of last year, it’s unlikely you will have to cut a check to the tax man. Instead, you will see your federal and state refunds reduced by whatever income taxes you owe on your jobless benefits.

What other new pandemic-related tax changes should I know about?

Congress made a number of changes to tax benefits, such as tweaking the rules to make the Earned Income Tax Credit more generous, or creating new ones for individuals and small business owners to provide pandemic relief.
Small business owners who received a tax-free, forgiven loan from the Paycheck Protection Program may still deduct the businesses expenses they paid for with their loan money.
Eligible self-employed people may claim a new sick leave and family leave tax credit that was created by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.
And lastly, individuals who take the standard deduction may now take a new charitable deduction even though they are not itemizing. Keep in mind, the deduction can only be taken for contributions made to an IRS-designated charitable organization known as a 501(c)(3), which would rule out many of the online fundraisers for individuals or businesses struggling during the Covid crisis.

Are there any new tax breaks for students?

Yes. The IRS has advised that if you received any pandemic-related emergency financial aid grants in 2020 you do not have to include that money in your gross income calculation.
Also, even if you used any part of those grants for qualified tuition and related expenses in 2020, you still may be eligible to claim a tuition and fees deduction, the American Opportunity Credit or the Lifetime Learning Credit on your return.
210516045214 covid 19 immunizers profiles split super 169 captis executive search management consulting leadership board services

These are the immunizers putting a personal face on a nationwide vaccination effort

Rummer, a pharmacist, and Reid, an intern, have been immunizing people in cities in Ohio as well as in rural communities such as their own in Upper Sandusky, Ohio.
“Growing up with a lot of these people, years later to come back as an immunizer and really help during something none of us have really been through before, for me it was just all about giving back to the community where we were raised,” Reid said.
Nick Reid and Hannah Rummer.Nick Reid and Hannah Rummer.
Vaccination venues are no longer just large stadiums and massive facilities — now, those tasked with being the touchpoint for Covid-19 prevention are often local pharmacists and health care workers. The advantage, the sister and brother team told CNN, is that they put a familiar face on an experience that still makes people wary.
“A personal connection can be made so quickly. Just taking even five, ten seconds of your day can make a big impact,” Rummer said. “Having that human connection back, bringing levity to the situation or just asking how are they is key to ensuring they know it’s going to be OK.”
Experts including Dr. Anthony Fauci have estimated between 70% to 85% of the US population needs to be immune to the virus — through vaccination or previous infection — to control its spread. About 46% of US adults are fully vaccinated against Covid-19, according to data published Friday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Officials worry that closing the gap could be impeded by the number of people who have either decided against vaccination or are hesitant for safety reasons.
From reaching out to marginalized communities, to engaging customers who came only to pick up a prescription, to spending extra time chatting with someone awaiting a shot, immunizers told CNN that they are invested in the inoculation of their communities. Here are the stories they shared.
Frank Arredondo immunizing a patient.Frank Arredondo immunizing a patient.

He shares his near-death experience with patients

Whenever CVS pharmacist Frank Arrendondo hears patients refer to Covid-19 as a flu or a government conspiracy, he shares a story with them.
On March 26, 2020, while working at an independent pharmacy in McAllen, Texas, Arrendondo was struck with a wave of exhaustion. Though dealing with chills and aches, he was not diagnosed with Covid-19 until the next week.
Doctors said they would admit him to the hospital if his oxygen saturation was at or below 92, but when he was checked, his was at 78. His oxygen kept tanking even as he was hospitalized and put on nasal oxygen, he said.
His second day in the hospital, he was told he would need to be put on a ventilator. At the time, he said, he didn’t know the statistics on the likelihood he would not make it off the ventilator alive, but still he was terrified.
As he was sedated, Arrendondo said he suffered horrifying hallucinations: black ops devices hidden in his room, his wife running off with his doctor and nurses trying to kill him.
Fortunately, he did come off the ventilator and regained his lung capacity enough to train for a marathon, but he also came out with a special purpose to administer the vaccine, he said.
His focus is on McAllen’s Hispanic community, which Arrendondo says, may not always embrace the government vaccine messaging because of language barriers or cultural differences.
By spending extra time talking about his experience, explaining the benefits of vaccination and encouraging people to communicate the same to family and friends, Arrendondo sees a way to close that chasm.
“If there is not someone in their family circle or their circle of friends who they can identify with the diseases or put a face to the disease, I think it is important for the people who are doing the immunizations to personalize it,” Arrendondo said. “When they hear I was in the hospital for 15 days and ventilator for 10 they usually get it… It becomes a bit more real for them.”

He meets them where they are

Working in Chicago’s South Side, Stephen Fadowole said personalizing the vaccination experience is his way to fight health care disparity.
Fadowole immigrated to the US in 2011 from Nigeria, where people who need advanced care often must leave the country, he said. Seeing the difficulty some people experience getting access to necessary care, Fadowole said he didn’t just want to be a pharmacist, he wanted to be one who gave back to his community.
So as he watched Covid-19 shut down Chicago, Fadowole — a pharmacy manager at Walgreens — knew he needed to offer immunization protection to people who were underserved by the health care system or did not have the technological know-how to make an online appointment.
In response, he and his coworkers brought the vaccine to the community, visiting churches, community centers, long-term care facilities and community centers.
“How can we make this as easy and as comfortable and as pleasant as possible?” Fadowole said was his focus.
One key strategy, he said, was engaging with the skeptics in the community rather than making them feel the vaccine was being forced upon them.
“In my community, there is a lot of bad blood about the vaccine because of the Tuskegee experiment and other events that have made them skeptical about health care,” Fadowole said. “OK, you are skeptical? Ask me any questions.”
And when he has conversations with customers over the safety, science and importance of the vaccines, Fadowole said he makes sure to follow up with them the next day, he said.
“If we do that with every patient we could be done by July 4,” he said. “It’s the little decisions we make that turn into a national effort.”
Payal Patel and her grandfather.Payal Patel and her grandfather.

She works through her own grief

CVS pharmacist Payal Patel never slowed down vaccinating everyone she could, even as she grieved over the loss to Covid-19 of two of the most important people of her life.
“Not one more life should be taken by Covid,” Patel said. “We are passionate about it when we deliver this message.”
Patel was vaccinating at her first long-term care clinic in Camarillo, California, on November 29 when she got the news that her grandfather was admitted to the hospital with Covid-19.
Her usually quiet grandfather had a smile and a story to share with her every time she saw him, Patel said. She will never forget the look of pride in his eyes at her pharmacy school graduation, she said.
Weeks before he was admitted to the hospital, she was taking blessings at her grandfather’s feet for Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights, and days after she was watching him die for 15 minutes by Zoom, she said.
Ten days later, she got the call that her grandmother, who had raised her in India for ten years while her parents went to establish a life in the US, was also diagnosed with Covid-19.
By day eight, the family was back on Zoom, saying prayers as she took her last breath, only miles away.
Her bosses told her she should take time to mourn, but Patel couldn’t stop. She couldn’t vaccinate people quickly enough, she said.
“I continued working because I didn’t know what to do and I couldn’t let anybody’s grandma or grandpa pass away,” Patel said. “I just kept going.”
What can sometimes be a brief exchange is never impersonal to her, Patel said, and she values taking time with her patients.
“For me providing a vaccine is something that is life-giving or lifesaving, so it isn’t ever a transaction,” Patel said.
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Pre-market movers

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Most stock quote data provided by BATS. Market indices are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes. All times are ET. Disclaimer. Morningstar: Copyright 2018 Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Factset: FactSet Research Systems Inc.2018. All rights reserved. Chicago Mercantile Association: Certain market data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Dow Jones: The Dow Jones branded indices are proprietary to and are calculated, distributed and marketed by DJI Opco, a subsidiary of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC and have been licensed for use to S&P Opco, LLC and CNN. Standard & Poor’s and S&P are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC and Dow Jones is a registered trademark of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC. All content of the Dow Jones branded indices Copyright S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC 2018 and/or its affiliates.

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Gov. Hogan: Trump is toxic for the GOP

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Republican congressman calls out 'bogus' claims by GOP colleagues downplaying Capitol riot

“It’s absolutely bogus. You know, I was there. I watched a number of the folks walk down to the White House and then back. I have a balcony on my office. So I saw them go down. I heard the noise — the flash bangs, I smelled some of the gas as it moved my way,” the Michigan congressman told CNN’s Dana Bash on “State of the Union” when asked about comments made by several congressional Republicans last week who attempted to re-write what happened on January 6.
Fact check: A week of brazen Republican dishonesty Fact check: A week of brazen Republican dishonesty
Among the claims made was one by Rep. Andrew Clyde, a Republican from Georgia, who falsely compared the riot to a tourist visit, saying during a hearing on the attack that “there was no insurrection and to call it an insurrection, in my opinion, is a bold baseline.”
Upton told Bash he wasn’t sure what was motivating his colleagues to make such claims, but that those statements stand as a reason why he supports a bipartisan commission to investigate the attack. Lawmakers on Friday cleared a hurdle on Friday in creating a bipartisan commission after the top Democrat and Republican on the House Homeland Security Committee struck a deal on how to structure the independent panel.
“Get the facts out, try to assure the American public this is what happened, and let the facts lead us to the conclusion,” Upton said.
This story is breaking and will be updated.