CT scans may catch more low bone density sufferers before spine surgery

spine surgery

[Photo by Joyce McCown on Unsplash]

A CT scan before spine surgery turned up a significant number of patients with previously undiagnosed low bone density, according to a new study out of Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.

The study, presented yesterday at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, suggests there may be value in prospective lumbar, or lower, spine patients first receiving a CT scan in the area.

Get the full story from our sister site Medical Design & Outsourcing. 

 

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England-based spine surgeon authors self-help book for back, neck pain patients — 4 insights

George Ampat, FRCS, a consultant orthopedic surgeon at England-based Royal Liverpool University Hospitals, wrote a self-help book for people living with back and neck pain.

UP Health System welcomes Dr. Richard Frieden — 4 notes

Richard Frieden, MD, joined Marquette, Mich.-based UP Health System, according to UPMatters.com.

American Hospital Association to award Dr. James Weinstein — 7 highlights

The American Hospital Association will honor orthopedic spine surgeon James N. Weinstein, DO, with the Justin Ford Kimball Innovators Award, according to VTDIGGER.

6 observations on lateral lumbar interbody fusion global market

An increasing prevalence of degenerative diseases and lower back pain will drive the global lateral lumbar interbody fusion market, according to a Transparency Market Research analysis.

Here are six observations:

1. Another market driver is enhanced visualization technologies, which offers a simpler and more precise procedure.

2. Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion is gaining popularity, due to outcomes involving enhanced spine alignment, less blood loss and less tissue damage.

3. The costliness of lateral lumbar interbody fusions may deter market growth, though.

4. Additionally, several lateral lumbar interbody fusion risks exist, such as psoas muscle or neural network injury and bone graft fusion complications.

5. North America leads the global market, due to technological advancements, research and development investments and improved healthcare infrastructure.

6. Dominant market players include:

• DePuy Synthes in Raynham, Mass.
• NuVasive in San Diego
• Stryker Corp. in Kalamazoo, Mich.
• Smith & Nephew in London, United Kingdom
• Medtronic in Dublin, Ireland
• Paradigm Spine in New York City
• Alphatec Spine in Carlsbad, Calif.

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Dr. Anthony D'Ambrosio joins ranks of Expert Network: 6 highlights

Here are six highlights:

1. Peer reviews, recognitions and career accomplishments elevated Dr. D’Ambrosio to the title of a distinguished doctor.

2. Dr. D’Ambrosio serves as the director of Neurosurgeons of New Jersey in Ridgewood as well as an assistant professor of neurosurgery at New York City-based Columbia University.

3. He also serves as co-director of Ridgewood, N.J.-based Valley Hospital’s Gamma Knife Perfexion Program.

4. He specializes in brain tumors, skull base tumors, meningiomas, acoustic neuromas, pituitary tumors, Chiari malformation and microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm.

5. His research on neuro-oncology, brain metastases surgical management and surgical strategies for giant pituitary adenomas have appeared in various publications.

6. Dr. D’Ambrosio completed his skull base and cerebrovascular surgery fellowship at University of South Florida in Tampa.

More articles on spine:
Dr. James Lynch first Nevada surgeon to use Titan Spine technology — 5 takeaways
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Neurosurgeon Dr. Stephen Ondra joins RowdMap executive team: 7 highlights

Neurosurgeon Stephen Ondra, MD, joined Louisville, Ky.-based RowdMap as head of clinical risk innovation strategy, according to Yahoo! Finance.

RowdMap’s Risk-Readiness platform assists providers in identifying, quantifying and reducing no-value care.

Here are seven highlights:

1. In his new role, Dr. Ondra will offer clinical expertise and payer advice to help with the transition to value-based care.

2. He will leverage government benchmark data and other information to create approaches for improving the value of healthcare, such as efficiencies to reduce low value care and Pay-for-Value Ready Networks.

3. Dr. Ondra joins RowdMap from North Start Healthcare Consulting.

4. He served in the United States Army and was a neurological surgery professor at Chicago-based Northwestern University.

5. Dr. Ondra previously served in the Executive Office of the President as the National Science and Technology Council’s co-chair for health information technology. He also was the senior healthcare advisor to the secretary of Veterans Affairs.

6. Following his time in the government, Dr. Ondra became senior vice president and CMO of Chicago-based Memorial Hospital.

7. He then became senior vice president and CMO of Chicago-based Health Care Services Corporation.

More articles on spine:
Dr. James Lynch first Nevada surgeon to use Titan Spine technology — 5 takeaways
Medical College of Wisconsin names Dr. Shekar Kurpad chair of neurosurgery — 5 things to know
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On the bookshelf: The books 3 spine surgeons say helped them professionally

Three spine surgeons sound off on the books that have influenced their professional lives.

Ask Spine Surgeons is a weekly series of questions posed to spine surgeons around the country about clinical, business and policy issues affecting spine care. We invite all spine surgeon and specialist responses.

Next week’s question: What techniques and technologies should no longer be used in spine care? What are some alternates?

Please send responses to Anuja Vaidya at [email protected] by Wednesday, April 5, at 5 p.m. CST.

Question: What is the best book you have read in the past year that has made an impact on your career?

Plas T. James, MD. Spine Surgeon at Atlanta Spine Institute: A book that has impacted my career would be Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell. It’s about how people become great, what success means to different people and learning about what it takes to make it in any field. I think it’s been my favorite book so far this year, and I think it allows me to remember that no matter what your profession is, you have to [put in] the time to become the best you can be.

Kern Singh, MD. Co-Director of Minimally Invasive Spine Institute at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (Chicago): “Power of Habit” by Charles Duhigg. The book elucidates the roles of habits in one’s daily life and thought processes. By reprogramming small negative habits into positive ones, you have the power to greatly improve the productivity of anything you involve yourself with. Personally, I focused on incorporating habits associated with locating potential study candidates into the workflow of my clinical team. These changes allow me and the team to handle a hectic clinic day while enrolling patients for multiple studies, resulting in a productive clinical research group.

Vladimir Sinkov, MD. Spine Surgeon at New Hampshire Orthopaedic Center (Nashua): “Atlas Shrugged” by Ayn Rand.  If you have read it, you will understand.

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Dr. James Lynch first Nevada surgeon to use Titan Spine technology — 5 takeaways

James Lynch, MD, of Reno-based SpineNevada was the first surgeon in the state to use Titan Spine’s nano surface technology in anterior lumbar interbody fusion and lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedures.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. The Titan Spine’s implant surface technology promotes differentiation into bone-forming cells, increasing bone production around the implant site and expediting the fusion process.

2. The device helps the body produce and regulate its own BMP at vital fusion stages rather than rely on external BMP.

3. Dr. Lynch performs spine surgeries in hospital and outpatient center settings throughout Nevada.

4. Becker’s Healthcare Publisher Scott Becker said, “Jim Lynch is a world-renowned spine surgeon.”

5. Dr. Lynch has performed minimally invasive spine surgery since 2002 and was the first neurosurgeon in Reno to perform MIS TLIF and PLIF procedures in addition to being the first to perform cervical and lumbar artificial disc replacements.

More articles on spine:
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Workers’ spinal fusion claims reported as strains in 62% of cases: 5 things to know