Dr. Brian Cole operates on New York Knicks' Derrick Rose — 5 takeaways

Here are five things to know:

1. Dr. Cole performed arthroscopic surgery on a medial meniscus tear in Mr. Rose’s left knee.

2. The Knick say the point guard may resume basketball activities in three to six weeks.

3. The surgery took place on Wednesday, Apr. 5 in Chicago in collaboration with Knicks team physicians.

4. Dr. Cole is the Chicago Bulls’ team physician and handled Mr. Rose’s previous knee surgeries, according to K.C. Johnson of The Chicago Tribune.

5. The surgery was described as “uncomplicated” by the Knicks.

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4 physicians treating women's Final Four basketball teams

The four remaining teams in the women’s collegiate NCAA basketball tournament are facing off in this weekend’s Final Four in Dallas.

Here are the physicians treating players on the four top teams of the 2017 NCAA tournament:

Connecticut

Deena Casiero, MD, of Farmington, Conn.-based UConn Health is head team physician for Storrs-based University of Connecticut’s women’s basketball team.

Dr. Casiero serves as director of primary care sports medicine and associate clinical professor at UConn. She previously provided care for Hempstead, N.Y.-based Hofstra University athletics and was director of player medical services for the United States Open Tennis Championship. Dr. Casiero is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society of Sports Medicine and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. Her clinical interests include acute sports-related shoulder, hip, knee and ankle injuries, overuse injuries in young athletes and sports-related concussions.

Dr. Casiero graduated from Valhalla-based New York Medical College, and completed her internal medicine residency at New York City-based Montefiore Medical Center. She then went on to complete her sports medicine fellowship at the UConn School of Medicine.

Mississippi State

Robert Looney, DO, Philip Pearson, DO, Michael Mabry, MD, Bob Collins, MD, and Cliff Story, MD, serve as Mississippi State University’s women’s basketball team physicians.

The team’s orthopedists are Chris Galjour, MD, Justin Hall, MD, Scott Jones, MD, David Macias, MD, Chad Altmyer, MD, Russell Linton, MD, and Kenny Edwards, MD, of Columbus (Miss.) Orthopaedic Clinic.  

South Carolina

Jeffrey Guy, MD, of Columbia-based University Specialty Clinics is team physician for the University of South Carolina’s women’s basketball team.

Dr. Guy is the University of South Carolina’s medical director and serves as team physician for the football, women’s soccer, swimming and track & field teams in addition to the women’s basketball team. He is assistant professor within the University’s department of orthopedic surgery and sports medicine and a member of The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, American Sports Medicine Institute Fellowship Society, Clinical Orthopaedic Society and the South Carolina Medical Association. Dr. Guy served as a team surgeon for the Beijing, China Olympic Games in 2008 and was named Physician of the Year by the South Carolina Medical Association in 2011.

After obtaining his medical degree from Boston-based Harvard University and completing a residency at Harvard University School of Medicine, Dr. Guy completed fellowships at Boston-based Massachusetts General/Trauma, Boston Children’s Hospital and Birmingham, Ala.-based American Sports Medicine Institute.

Stanford

Geoffrey Abrams, MD, of The Palo Alto (Calif.) Veterans Affairs Health Care System is team physician for the Stanford (Calif.) University women’s basketball team.

In addition to the care he offers the women’s basketball team, Dr. Abrams serves as team physician for the Stanford men’s tennis team and Belmont, Calif.-based Notre Dame de Namur University. He is assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at The Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System and serves as a reviewer for several sports medicine journals.

Over the course of his career, Dr. Abrams has authored or co-authored over 40 peer-reviewed articles and over 20 book chapters and has presented his research at national and international meetings. He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, California Orthopaedic Association, Arthroscopy Association of North America and Western Orthopaedic Association.

After obtaining his medical degree at the University of California, San Diego, Dr. Abrams completed his residency at Stanford University School of Medicine and his fellowship at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

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$1B NFL concussion settlement — 5 things to know

After nearly six years of complex negotiations, former NFL players claiming to suffer from football-inflicted brain injuries have yet to receive monetary compensation from the league, according to ESPN.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. Thousands of former players and their families have filed hundreds of lawsuits since 2011, claiming the NFL had covered up the link between football and brain damage.

2. Although a settlement was reached in 2013, the overseeing judge and a series of objections prevented the case from being finalized until very recently.

3. Legal fees have severely cut into money former players and their families were supposed to gain.

4. Many former players depend on the monetary award to fund the care of their respective conditions.

5. The NFL agreed to pay lawyers who negotiated the settlement $112.5 million, but those who have been involved disagree on the exact amount each attorney deserves to earn.

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3 physicians treat Atlanta Hawks forward Paul Millsap — 4 details

3 physicians treat Atlanta Hawks forward Paul Millsap — 4 details

Atlanta Hawks forward Paul Millsap visited with and was treated by three physicians after recently being diagnosed with left knee synovitis.

Here are four things to know:

1. Mr. Millsap visited James Andrews, MD, of Andrews Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center in Pensacola, Fla., and consulted with Kyle Hammond, MD, of Emory University of School of Medicine in Atlanta and Kenneth R. Mautner, MD, of Emory Health.

2. Mr. Millsap underwent a non-surgical procedure on Monday, March 28 at Atlanta-based Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center to treat the swelling membrane lining the knee joint.

3. The 32-year-old has been extremely durable over his career, never missing more than nine games per season, according to Bleacher Report.

4. The forward is expected to miss three games before returning to the lineup.

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96% of runners return to running after arthroscopic hip surgery — 5 details

Here are five things to know:

1. Researchers reviewed 51 FAI patients who had undergone hip arthroscopy and had been recreational or competitive runners beforehand.

2. They found 49 patients returned to running at an average of nine months after surgery.

3. High BMI was often associated with slower return to running.

4. Patients’ mean running distance decreased from 10 miles per week to six miles per week two years after the operation.

5. Patients were more active after surgery, with females progressing faster than males.

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Drs. Ken Akizuki and Neal ElAttrache recommend Giants' pitcher undergo Tommy John Surgery

San Francisco Giants pitcher Will Smith will likely undergo Tommy John Surgery after team orthopedist Ken Akizuki, MD, of San Francisco-based SOAR Medical and Neal ElAttrache, MD, of Los Angeles-based Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedics agreed in their diagnoses, according to CSN Bay Area.

The stem cell procedure that may change the sports medicine field in 2017 — 5 observations

Physicians, healthcare professionals and members of the MLB community will keep a close eye on Red Sox pitcher Andrew Pomeranz’s recovery from a potentially career-saving stem cell procedure, according to The Boston Globe.

Here are five things to know:

1. Steve Yoon, MD, of the Los Angeles-based Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic extracted bone marrow from Mr. Pomeranz’s hip bone and back and injected it into his flexor tendon.

2. Mr. Pomeranz was motivated to undergo the procedure after fellow pitchers Garrett Richards and Andrew Heaney opted for the treatment instead of undergoing Tommy John Surgery to treat the partial tears in their ulnar collateral ligaments.

3. Lyle Cain, MD, of Birmingham, Ala.-based Andrews Sports Medicine & Orthopedic Center said, “Stem cells are a way to try to deliver the chemicals to cells and the chemical attractive factors to that area to allow the body to heal that tissue. That’s what PRP was used for as well. Stem cells have more promise because not only do they have the chemicals that platelet-rich plasma has, but you’re also putting some of the healing cells themselves in that area.”

4. Pitcher Bartolo Colon was the first baseball player known to receive stem cell treatment when he received injections in his injured rotator cuff and elbow in the Dominican Republic in 2010. The 43-year-old pitcher’s career was resurrected following the operation, partially prompting the method’s increased popularity.

5. If Mr. Pomeranz has a successful 2017 season, the number of players undergoing stem cell procedures may rise.

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This ex-NFL player is set to begin his neurosurgery residency

Neurosurgeon-to-be Myron Rolle is a former football safety and Rhodes Scholar who was motivated to become a top brain surgeon by his experience in sports and Ben Carson, MD, according to The Washington Post.

Here are five things to know:

1. Mr. Rolle graduated from Florida State University in two-and-a-half years before studying at U.K-based Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar.

2. He was drafted by the Tennessee Titans in the sixth round of the 2010 NFL draft and retired from football in 2012, although he admits he still misses the game.

3. Regarding the correlation between football, concussions and spinal injuries, Mr. Rolle said, “I’m always thinking, how can I influence other players to have that light turn on sooner? Think about it: I had an interest in neurosurgery and still didn’t make it a priority. Can you imagine someone with no interest in the brain? What’s their level of concern?”

4. Mr. Rolle has assisted on over 200 surgeries so far and recently matched with Boston-based Massachusetts General Hospital for his residency. He will graduate from Tallahassee-based Florida State University College of Medicine in May and plans to begin his Boston residency in July.

5. His residency application included a letter of reference from Sec. Ben Carson, MD, a long-time role model of his with whom he has developed a close relationship over the years.

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Andrews Institute investing in regenerative medicine — 5 takeaways

Gulf Breeze, Fla.-based Andrews Institute for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine relies on evidence-based medicine and research to improve its use of regenerative medicine.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. Stem cell technologies and point of care blood products both remain experimental and require more research.

2. Orthopedic surgeon Adam Anz, MD, of the Andrews Institute said, “We are making sure that there is evidence around safety and effectiveness before we make claims or advertise about regenerative medicine because at this point it needs more studying since it’s experimental.”

3. Bone marrow aspirate concentrate and platelet rich plasma don’t require FDA approval for the way Andrews Institute uses them.

4. Andrews Institute is currently conducting research on regenerative medicine’s impact on ligament, cartilage and osteoarthritis treatment.

5. Dr. Anz noted that Andrews Institute founder and famed orthopedic sports medicine physician James Andrews, MD, believes the arthroscope was the first great advancement in sports medicine while the second is bound to be regenerative medicine.

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Carolina Panthers head team physician Pat Connor, MD, of Charlotte-based OrthoCarolina will treat quarterback Cam Newton and wide receiver Damiere Byrd while Bruce Darden, MD, of OrthoCarolina treated defensive lineman Charles Johnson yesterday.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. Dr. Connor will perform arthroscopic shoulder surgery on Mr. Newton’s throwing shoulder at Charlotte-based Carolinas Medical Center. My Newton partially tore his rotator cuff in a week 14 game last season.

2. Following initial evaluations and test results, Mr. Newton was cleared to finish the season without missing remaining games, although his weight room and field work was partially modified. Original rehabilitation wasn’t as productive as Dr. Connor had hoped it would be, leading him to recommend Mr. Newton undergo arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

3. Mr. Newton will begin a throwing program 12 weeks after surgery. If he progresses well, he will return to play with the team 16 weeks after surgery.

4. Dr. Connor will perform a scope on the torn lateral meniscus in Mr. Byrd’s left knee.

5. Dr. Darden performed a microdiscectomy on Mr. Johnson on Tuesday, March 21 after an epidural injection failed to relieve the defensive lineman’s back pain.

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