#BIO2017: What’s Happening in the World of IP?

Who’s ready to hit the beach?

Wait, did I say beach? I meant the San Diego Convention Center.

….But the beach will be waiting for you once you wrap up two and a half days of IP educational programming!

Let’s take a look at what will be on the agenda for BIO’s Intellectual Property Track next week at our International Convention (not registered yet? We can solve that, just go here!)

Monday, June 19, 2017

Of Rats and Men: The Success Story of Human Therapeutic Antibodies Produced in the Omnirat
Time: 4:00 PM–5:00 PM    Date: Jun 19, 2017
Location: Room 7B, Upper Level

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

 

 

 

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

 

**Continuing Legal Education

Some of our Intellectual Property sessions at BIO will offer attorneys an opportunity to obtain Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credits in select states. Application for CLE credit will be submitted in California and Virginia, and attorneys will be notified if BIO receives credit approval. Attorneys needing CLE credit from other states are welcome to sign in, pick up the CLE forms and apply to their jurisdictions on their own. BIO will provide you with documentation when applying for CLE credit.

One Health for the 21st Century

In remarkable ways, the embracing of the One Health concept over the last decade has resulted in a dramatic shift in the discussions, practices, polices and partnerships that link the health of people, animals and our shared environments. In part, One Health has benefited from many innovative, collaborative efforts well underway and years in the making.  In other ways, the efforts have been focused on improving on 20th Century approaches and meeting 20th Century goals rather than boldly leading us into the 21st Century.  While the movement has had positive effects, the challenge remains to expand stakeholder engagement in One Health and think more broadly about where opportunities for impact may lie.

One Health is not only about infectious diseases; non-transmissible diseases, the health of plants and animals, the quality of our water and air, and the safety of the environment in which we live, share, and depend all fit within the rubric. But since infections shared among animals and people account for nearly two-thirds of human infectious diseases, and the majority of these are from wildlife, “low-hanging fruit” for collaborative benefits can be found at the human/animal/environment interface of infectious diseases and even pandemics.  The environment and how we interact with it is key because we know that the leading drivers of disease emergence in humans result from activities such as land use change, food production systems, and trade and travel.  This reality reveals the need to embrace a wider range of civil society and private sector partners and indicates the valuable role that the biotechnology sector can play.

We now have the ability to predict where outbreaks are most likely to happen and under which circumstances, thus we can take action to reduce risk and mitigate adverse outcomes.  As with earthquakes, we can identify areas of higher risk, and we can engineer solutions to mitigate impact.

One Heath action requires the efforts of more than just policy makers, academics and practitioners. It is dependent on engagement, and often leadership, from civil society and the private sector.  Fire safety serves as good analogy.  Fire fighters don’t just put out fires, they engage the community in fire prevention.  School children are taught safety, buildings and products are designed and manufactured to be fire safe.  Companies sell smoke detectors and fire extinguishers to private citizens.  Data crunchers map out tax delinquencies as a predictor of arson.  Health in the 21st Century requires this same whole of society effort and requires the creation of opportunities for the inclusion and engagement of a wide range of actors to participate.  In essence, this is the heart of the One Health concept.

Dr. Karesh is scheduled to speak at BIO’s 2017 International Convention in San Diego on Monday, June 19, as part of BIO’s “One Health Day” programming.  This unique half-day session provides an opportunity for attendees to engage in discussions around the promises of One Health innovations to help us better heal, fuel and feed the world.

One Health for the 21st Century

In remarkable ways, the embracing of the One Health concept over the last decade has resulted in a dramatic shift in the discussions, practices, polices and partnerships that link the health of people, animals and our shared environments. In part, One Health has benefited from many innovative, collaborative efforts well underway and years in the making.  In other ways, the efforts have been focused on improving on 20th Century approaches and meeting 20th Century goals rather than boldly leading us into the 21st Century.  While the movement has had positive effects, the challenge remains to expand stakeholder engagement in One Health and think more broadly about where opportunities for impact may lie.

One Health is not only about infectious diseases; non-transmissible diseases, the health of plants and animals, the quality of our water and air, and the safety of the environment in which we live, share, and depend all fit within the rubric. But since infections shared among animals and people account for nearly two-thirds of human infectious diseases, and the majority of these are from wildlife, “low-hanging fruit” for collaborative benefits can be found at the human/animal/environment interface of infectious diseases and even pandemics.  The environment and how we interact with it is key because we know that the leading drivers of disease emergence in humans result from activities such as land use change, food production systems, and trade and travel.  This reality reveals the need to embrace a wider range of civil society and private sector partners and indicates the valuable role that the biotechnology sector can play.

We now have the ability to predict where outbreaks are most likely to happen and under which circumstances, thus we can take action to reduce risk and mitigate adverse outcomes.  As with earthquakes, we can identify areas of higher risk, and we can engineer solutions to mitigate impact.

One Heath action requires the efforts of more than just policy makers, academics and practitioners. It is dependent on engagement, and often leadership, from civil society and the private sector.  Fire safety serves as good analogy.  Fire fighters don’t just put out fires, they engage the community in fire prevention.  School children are taught safety, buildings and products are designed and manufactured to be fire safe.  Companies sell smoke detectors and fire extinguishers to private citizens.  Data crunchers map out tax delinquencies as a predictor of arson.  Health in the 21st Century requires this same whole of society effort and requires the creation of opportunities for the inclusion and engagement of a wide range of actors to participate.  In essence, this is the heart of the One Health concept.

Dr. Karesh is scheduled to speak at BIO’s 2017 International Convention in San Diego on Monday, June 19, as part of BIO’s “One Health Day” programming.  This unique half-day session provides an opportunity for attendees to engage in discussions around the promises of One Health innovations to help us better heal, fuel and feed the world.

#BIO2017: A Peek at Pavilions | Sub-Saharan Africa

Breaking Buzz is BIO’s newest blog series that reaches across the globe to bring you an insider’s preview into the hottest international and partnering trends coming to San Diego for the BIO International Convention.

The Fastest-Growing Continent You Thought You Knew

The African continent is currently home to seven of the world’s top-ten fastest-growing economies; and by 2050 (just 33 years from today!) is projected to represent 26% of the global population.

Let that sink in for a minute.

There are 54 countries within the continent which spans more than 11.7 million square miles – second only to Asia both in percentage of land on earth, and population; it is home to over 1.2 billion people many of whom are now referred to as the world’s fastest-growing middle class. And get this: World Economics, a research organization that measures global economic activity, reports that the African continent has surpassed Europe and the Americas in real GDP growth when measuring by continent, from 1961 to 2015.

So what’s a continent to do with so much potential? Breaking Buzz asked Jennifer Dent, President of BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH) just that and she says, it all starts at the BIO International Convention.

“We brought in the first African delegation to the Convention from Nigeria in 2014. The next year, six countries came, and we had the first Africa Pavilion. Last year in San Francisco we had 16 African countries present. But this year in San Diego we will have 24 countries from the African continent and upward of 30 delegates – and for the record, these aren’t just any delegates. The delegates at the pavilion have real authority, so expect action.”

She is referring to Ministry of Health officials and advisors representing several countries, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, Côte d’Ivoire; and high-level decision makers from academic, non-profit organizations, and life science companies. Collectively they represent 24 of the African continent’s 54 countries and share a common mission: to engage biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and life science companies in meaningful initiatives, programs and partnerships to impact global health.

The quality of attendee is a direct reflection of recent findings reported by the World Bank who had this to say about Africa: Fostering public and private investment in infrastructure has become a priority to the African continent, [so] with well-targeted capital investments and policies fostering competitiveness and productivity, Africa’s larger and younger work force has the potential to transform the continent.

Jennifer Dent, President BVGH

“Think about what’s important to industry” says Dent; “they’re looking for growth opportunities in markets across the globe, and as the World Bank reveals, Africa has made considerable progress in its infrastructure development and emerging market status. While these countries have grown and prospered, however, so have non-communicable diseases like cancer and diabetes gown in prevalence; these aren’t just markets for anti-malarials and other anti-infectives anymore.”

To enter the African market, Dent stresses that partnerships will be critical to obtaining the in-depth knowledge of the continent’s infrastructure, politics, and disease landscape; that’s where the Convention comes into play and why she’ll be launching a new initiative in San Diego this year.

The African Access Initiative  will be launched on Wednesday at the BIO International Convention in San Diego; it is an integrated package of programs, activities, and partnerships designed to address the primary barriers to cancer treatment in Africa. The AAI will create new business models and tap into company products to establish access to cancer medicines and biologics. The program will augment the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer which is furthering research relating to cancers prevalent in Africa and facilitating and supporting training initiatives in oncology for health-care professionals. AAI will also support leading cancer researchers dedicated to building clinical trial networks, and determining how genetics affect the types of cancer prevalent to the area.

Two groups from Kenya, incubator Villgro Kenya, and the Kenya National Innovation Agency whose Chairman Professor Reuben Marwanga will also be present, are both working toward the development of a better ecosystem to support innovation and innovators in the country.

“That’s a lot,” says Dent enthusiastically, “and we have just scratched the surface. There are many milestones being reached in Africa, and taking it all in can be a challenge; which is why we’re presenting a one-hour media event at BIO to overview each of the 24 countries and their primary areas of therapeutics.”

Jim Greenwood, BIO President and long-time Africa advocate will open the event at 10:45 on Tuesday morning, the first full day of the Convention. Also in attendance will be the European Commission’s Deputy Head of Unit, Health Directorate Dr. Philippe Cupers who will introduce the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership.

The event will take place in the African Pavilion where you can visit 24 countries in one hour. No frequent flyer miles earned, but hey, what an efficient way to travel.

Filed under: Events, , , , , , , , , , , ,

#BIO2017: A Peek at Pavilions | Sub-Saharan Africa

Breaking Buzz is BIO’s newest blog series that reaches across the globe to bring you an insider’s preview into the hottest international and partnering trends coming to San Diego for the BIO International Convention.

The Fastest-Growing Continent You Thought You Knew

The African continent is currently home to seven of the world’s top-ten fastest-growing economies; and by 2050 (just 33 years from today!) is projected to represent 26% of the global population.

Let that sink in for a minute.

There are 54 countries within the continent which spans more than 11.7 million square miles – second only to Asia both in percentage of land on earth, and population; it is home to over 1.2 billion people many of whom are now referred to as the world’s fastest-growing middle class. And get this: World Economics, a research organization that measures global economic activity, reports that the African continent has surpassed Europe and the Americas in real GDP growth when measuring by continent, from 1961 to 2015.

So what’s a continent to do with so much potential? Breaking Buzz asked Jennifer Dent, President of BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH) just that and she says, it all starts at the BIO International Convention.

“We brought in the first African delegation to the Convention from Nigeria in 2014. The next year, six countries came, and we had the first Africa Pavilion. Last year in San Francisco we had 16 African countries present. But this year in San Diego we will have 24 countries from the African continent and upward of 30 delegates – and for the record, these aren’t just any delegates. The delegates at the pavilion have real authority, so expect action.”

She is referring to Ministry of Health officials and advisors representing several countries, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, Côte d’Ivoire; and high-level decision makers from academic, non-profit organizations, and life science companies. Collectively they represent 24 of the African continent’s 54 countries and share a common mission: to engage biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and life science companies in meaningful initiatives, programs and partnerships to impact global health.

The quality of attendee is a direct reflection of recent findings reported by the World Bank who had this to say about Africa: Fostering public and private investment in infrastructure has become a priority to the African continent, [so] with well-targeted capital investments and policies fostering competitiveness and productivity, Africa’s larger and younger work force has the potential to transform the continent.

Jennifer Dent, President BVGH

“Think about what’s important to industry” says Dent; “they’re looking for growth opportunities in markets across the globe, and as the World Bank reveals, Africa has made considerable progress in its infrastructure development and emerging market status. While these countries have grown and prospered, however, so have non-communicable diseases like cancer and diabetes gown in prevalence; these aren’t just markets for anti-malarials and other anti-infectives anymore.”

To enter the African market, Dent stresses that partnerships will be critical to obtaining the in-depth knowledge of the continent’s infrastructure, politics, and disease landscape; that’s where the Convention comes into play and why she’ll be launching a new initiative in San Diego this year.

The African Access Initiative  will be launched on Wednesday at the BIO International Convention in San Diego; it is an integrated package of programs, activities, and partnerships designed to address the primary barriers to cancer treatment in Africa. The AAI will create new business models and tap into company products to establish access to cancer medicines and biologics. The program will augment the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer which is furthering research relating to cancers prevalent in Africa and facilitating and supporting training initiatives in oncology for health-care professionals. AAI will also support leading cancer researchers dedicated to building clinical trial networks, and determining how genetics affect the types of cancer prevalent to the area.

Two groups from Kenya, incubator Villgro Kenya, and the Kenya National Innovation Agency whose Chairman Professor Reuben Marwanga will also be present, are both working toward the development of a better ecosystem to support innovation and innovators in the country.

“That’s a lot,” says Dent enthusiastically, “and we have just scratched the surface. There are many milestones being reached in Africa, and taking it all in can be a challenge; which is why we’re presenting a one-hour media event at BIO to overview each of the 24 countries and their primary areas of therapeutics.”

Jim Greenwood, BIO President and long-time Africa advocate will open the event at 10:45 on Tuesday morning, the first full day of the Convention. Also in attendance will be the European Commission’s Deputy Head of Unit, Health Directorate Dr. Philippe Cupers who will introduce the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership.

The event will take place in the African Pavilion where you can visit 24 countries in one hour. No frequent flyer miles earned, but hey, what an efficient way to travel.

Filed under: Events, , , , , , , , , , , ,

BIO 2017 Innovation Zone Company Snapshot: NuvOx Pharma

The next big medical breakthrough may start in a small business with a big idea. Recognizing the potential and promise of early-stage companies for addressing unmet medical needs, the BIO International Convention will once again host the Innovation Zone on the exhibit floor of the San Diego Convention Center, June 19-22. Eighty emerging companies will showcase biotechnology breakthroughs in drug discovery, diagnostics, and other therapeutic platform technologies.

The Innovation Zone was created through a partnership with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the intent to group Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-funded companies together on the exhibit floor of the BIO International Convention. The SBIR program provides U.S. federal funding to small businesses engaged in research and development with demonstrated potential for commercialization. Companies are rigorously vetted through the NIH and NSF SBIR review process prior to receiving the funding.

Today we spoke with Innovation Zone exhibitor, John McGonigle, Business Development Associate at NuvOx Pharma, which is supported by NIH’s SBIR program.

BTN: What is your company’s lead product or technology?
NuvOx Pharma is developing a nanotechnology platform of therapeutics to treat life-threatening diseases characterized by hypoxia. The Company has clinical programs in cancer (Phase II), stroke (Ib/II) and sickle cell disease (Phase Ib).

BTN: How has the NIH’s SBIR program helped your company grow?
The NIH’s SBIR program has been instrumental in the development of NuvOx Pharma. For example, our oncology program was started by an NCI SBIR Phase I grant to help us reformulate an EMEA approved ultrasound contrast agent as a stable emulsion for oxygen delivery.  A Phase II NCI SBIR grant supported IND enabling animal studies, and helped us show that the drug can raise tumor oxygen levels to make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. We completed a Phase Ib/II clinical trial in brain cancer, and the FDA has allowed our IND for a Phase II clinical trial in this indication. We have applied to the NIH for a Phase IIb SBIR Bridge Award, which would match investor funds to support the Phase II clinical trial. In addition, the Company has received Phase I SBIR/STTR grants to develop nanotechnology products for heart disease (endocarditis and myocardial infarction) and cancer (pancreas and breast).

BTN: What are the upcoming milestones and long-term priorities for your company?
Long term, we recognize that hypoxia can be life-threatening in many medical conditions, including some of the biggest killers in the world such as cancer, stroke and heart attack. We intend to save lives by using our nanotechnology to deliver oxygen to hypoxic tissue more effectively than red blood cells. We have animal data showing improved outcomes in cancer, stroke, myocardial infarction, sickle cell disease, hemorrhagic shock, and traumatic brain injury.

Short term, we have several major milestones coming up in the next year. We are on track to start the Phase II clinical trial in oncology this fall.  We have an active Phase Ib/II clinical trial in stroke and we should have the first randomized data from that trial within the year.  We are on track to start a Phase Ib clinical trial in sickle disease this summer.  The NHLBI has recently funded a study in heart attack in pigs, which could provide the data needed to file an IND for a clinical trial in that indication.

BTN: What do you hope to gain out of your participation at the 2017 BIO International Convention?
We are seeking investors to help us develop our drug assets and corporate partners to help us develop our nanotechnology products.

BTN: Tell us something about your company that investors might not know…
$100M was spent developing the core technology for a diagnostic indication – as an ultrasound contrast agent.  It was used in 2,200 patients, and approved in Europe, but never marketed due to competitive pressures. NuvOx was formed to reposition the technology for its oxygen delivery ability. We have devised new formulations with the support of the NIH.  We have tested the nanotechnology products in multiple models – oxygen delivery and/or therapeutic effect has been shown in 26 peer-reviewed publications, many of which were supported by NIH funding, in particular by the NCI and NHLBI.  We have expanded the IP – and have 5 patents issued, 1 patent allowed and 12 patents pending.  The FDA regulates the technology as a Biologic, allowing 12 years exclusivity for a first in class indication – and we are the only technology in clinical trials in our class.  We would like to thank the NIH for its forward-thinking and continued support.  Feel free to stop by NuvOx Pharma’s kiosk in the NIH’s Innovation Zone at BIO San Diego if you would like to learn more.

BIO 2017 Innovation Zone Company Snapshot: NuvOx Pharma

The next big medical breakthrough may start in a small business with a big idea. Recognizing the potential and promise of early-stage companies for addressing unmet medical needs, the BIO International Convention will once again host the Innovation Zone on the exhibit floor of the San Diego Convention Center, June 19-22. Eighty emerging companies will showcase biotechnology breakthroughs in drug discovery, diagnostics, and other therapeutic platform technologies.

The Innovation Zone was created through a partnership with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the intent to group Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-funded companies together on the exhibit floor of the BIO International Convention. The SBIR program provides U.S. federal funding to small businesses engaged in research and development with demonstrated potential for commercialization. Companies are rigorously vetted through the NIH and NSF SBIR review process prior to receiving the funding.

Today we spoke with Innovation Zone exhibitor, John McGonigle, Business Development Associate at NuvOx Pharma, which is supported by NIH’s SBIR program.

BTN: What is your company’s lead product or technology?
NuvOx Pharma is developing a nanotechnology platform of therapeutics to treat life-threatening diseases characterized by hypoxia. The Company has clinical programs in cancer (Phase II), stroke (Ib/II) and sickle cell disease (Phase Ib).

BTN: How has the NIH’s SBIR program helped your company grow?
The NIH’s SBIR program has been instrumental in the development of NuvOx Pharma. For example, our oncology program was started by an NCI SBIR Phase I grant to help us reformulate an EMEA approved ultrasound contrast agent as a stable emulsion for oxygen delivery.  A Phase II NCI SBIR grant supported IND enabling animal studies, and helped us show that the drug can raise tumor oxygen levels to make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. We completed a Phase Ib/II clinical trial in brain cancer, and the FDA has allowed our IND for a Phase II clinical trial in this indication. We have applied to the NIH for a Phase IIb SBIR Bridge Award, which would match investor funds to support the Phase II clinical trial. In addition, the Company has received Phase I SBIR/STTR grants to develop nanotechnology products for heart disease (endocarditis and myocardial infarction) and cancer (pancreas and breast).

BTN: What are the upcoming milestones and long-term priorities for your company?
Long term, we recognize that hypoxia can be life-threatening in many medical conditions, including some of the biggest killers in the world such as cancer, stroke and heart attack. We intend to save lives by using our nanotechnology to deliver oxygen to hypoxic tissue more effectively than red blood cells. We have animal data showing improved outcomes in cancer, stroke, myocardial infarction, sickle cell disease, hemorrhagic shock, and traumatic brain injury.

Short term, we have several major milestones coming up in the next year. We are on track to start the Phase II clinical trial in oncology this fall.  We have an active Phase Ib/II clinical trial in stroke and we should have the first randomized data from that trial within the year.  We are on track to start a Phase Ib clinical trial in sickle disease this summer.  The NHLBI has recently funded a study in heart attack in pigs, which could provide the data needed to file an IND for a clinical trial in that indication.

BTN: What do you hope to gain out of your participation at the 2017 BIO International Convention?
We are seeking investors to help us develop our drug assets and corporate partners to help us develop our nanotechnology products.

BTN: Tell us something about your company that investors might not know…
$100M was spent developing the core technology for a diagnostic indication – as an ultrasound contrast agent.  It was used in 2,200 patients, and approved in Europe, but never marketed due to competitive pressures. NuvOx was formed to reposition the technology for its oxygen delivery ability. We have devised new formulations with the support of the NIH.  We have tested the nanotechnology products in multiple models – oxygen delivery and/or therapeutic effect has been shown in 26 peer-reviewed publications, many of which were supported by NIH funding, in particular by the NCI and NHLBI.  We have expanded the IP – and have 5 patents issued, 1 patent allowed and 12 patents pending.  The FDA regulates the technology as a Biologic, allowing 12 years exclusivity for a first in class indication – and we are the only technology in clinical trials in our class.  We would like to thank the NIH for its forward-thinking and continued support.  Feel free to stop by NuvOx Pharma’s kiosk in the NIH’s Innovation Zone at BIO San Diego if you would like to learn more.

Convention Programming to Feature “One Health” Concept

Bio-based Technologies Address Human, Animal, Plant and Environmental Health

At its heart, the concept of One Health is rooted in the notion that the health of humans, animals, and the environment are all interconnected. At BIO’s 2017 International Convention (June 19-22 in San Diego), programming will feature the One Health concept through stories that show how science and technology are making tomorrow’s breakthroughs possible.

On Monday, June 19, BIO will host “One Health Day,” bringing together different parts of the BIO family with sessions focused on issues linking human, animal and environmental health. Scheduled speakers include:

Keynote:  One Health for the 21st Century

  • Dr. William Karesh, Executive Vice President for Health and Policy at EcoHealth Alliance

“The very concept of ‘One Health’ is ancient,” says Dr. William Karesh, Executive Vice President for Health and Policy at EcoHealth Alliance. “But our world has changed dramatically, and what’s really exciting is that with 21st Century innovation we have the opportunity to begin to end the pandemic era.”

Human, Animal and Plant Health Connectedness – Industry’s Role:

  • Dr. Carsten Brunn, Bayer’s Head of Pharmaceuticals, Americas Region
  • Frank Terhorst, Bayer’s Global Head of Seeds

“With emerging issues like a rapidly aging population and new and increasingly complex medical needs, our industry is at the forefront of advancements in science and technology that will help cure and prevent some of the most difficult-to-treat conditions, and improve lives,” said Dr. Carsten Brunn, Bayer’s Head of Pharmaceuticals, Americas Region. “With Bayer’s focus across the life science ecosystem, we are actively working to discover and develop innovations that impact the health of people, animals, and plants.”

“As the world’s population is projected to increase by more than three billion people in the next thirty years, we will require an adequate supply of healthy food as well as improved medical care,” stated Frank Terhorst, global head of seeds at Bayer CropScience. “Our research and development activities, fundamental to the well-being of society, are therefore linked by the concept of ‘One Health,’ with the goal of finding solutions to some of the major challenges of our time.”

Panel Discussion:  How to Move “One Health” Forward

  • Dr. Eddie Sullivan, CEO, SAB Biotherapeutics and Chairman, BIO Food & Ag Section Governing Board (moderator)
  • Dr. Laura Kahn, Research Scholar, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University and Co-Founder, One Health Initiative
  • Dr. Nikos Gurfield, Adjunct Professor of Pathology, UC San Diego and County Veterinarian, San Diego County Vector Disease and Diagnostic Laboratory
  • Dr. William Karesh, Executive Vice President for Health and Policy at EcoHealth Alliance

“Science and technology hold the promise of securing a healthier world for humans, animals and the environment,” says Dr. Eddie Sullivan, CEO, SAB Biotherapeutics and Chairman, BIO Food & Ag Section Governing Board. “To make these breakthroughs a reality, we’ll need a collaborative approach for addressing existing political and economic obstacles and opportunities.”

In our speaker presentations and panel discussions, attendees will hear stories that illustrate the concept of “One Health” and how modern technologies are enabling us to solve global challenges through a collaborative One Health-focused approach. Panelists will also explore the barriers to success and what industry and others can do to solve the problems One Health is poised to address.

BIO 2017 International Convention (BIO 2017) is in San Diego June 19-22 and registration is now open! Check out the complete BIO 2017 program including Keynotes, Super Sessions, Educational Tracks and Fireside Chats with scientific experts, government leaders and leading biotech CEOs. And stay tuned for more updates as we approach BIO 2017!

Filed under: Food And Agriculture, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Diverse #BIO2017 Super Sessions Cover Trump, Manufacturing, and the Future

Announced this week, BIO 2017’s Super Sessions offer compelling, topical and relevant discussions on topics ranging from what manufacturing strategy is best for producing new drugs to how Washington and the Trump administration may impact investment and trade to a debate about affordable access to innovative medicines. Beginning on Monday afternoon, the five, 75 minute sessions will run every day of the Convention with the last one appropriately focused on looking to the future.

For a complete breakdown of this year’s Super Sessions, visit mybio.org.
Highlights include:

Monday, June 19
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
So Many Choices: What’s the Right Bio-manufacturing Strategy for Me?
This panel will review the formidable challenges and decisions facing biopharma executives preparing to launch a new product.
Moderator:
S. Ann Montgomery, Editor-in-Chief, BioProcess International
Panelists:
Som Chattopadhyay, VP, Supply Chain, Amgen
Steve Lam, Senior VP, Biologics, Patheon
Matt Ottmer, COO, Momenta
Johannes Roebers, CEO, Cilatus BioPharma AG

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Dealmakers’ Intentions: 2017 Market Outlook
A highly distinguished panel of deal-makers will explore the impact market forces may have on pharmaceutical and biotech companies as they strive to make the next big deal.
Moderator:
Neel Patel, Managing Director, Commercial Strategy & Planning, inVentiv Health Consulting
Panelists:
Paul Biondi, Senior VP & Head, Business Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb
Doug Gioradano, Senior VP, Worldwide Business Development, Pfizer
Patrick Verheyen, Global Head, Janssen Business Development, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
Timothy P. Walbert Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Horizon Pharma

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Our Common Goal: Ensuring Access and Affordability of Innovative Medicines
This session will address the questions of how we ensure access and affordability of innovative medicines.
Moderator:
Ron Cohen, President and Chief Executive Officer, Acorda Therapeutics
Panelists:
Jeffrey Berkowitz, CEO, Optum International
Jeremy Levin, CEO & Chairman of the Board of Directors, Ovid Therapeutics
David Meeker, EVP and Head, Sanofi Genzyme
Steve Miller, SVP and Chief Medical Officer, Research and Clinical Sciences at Express Scripts, Inc.

Wednesday, June 21
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
The Trade and Investment Policies of the Trump Administration
This panel will focus on the Trump Administration’s trade and investment policies and their impact on the biotechnology industry.
Moderator:
Brian Pomper, Partner, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP
Speaker:
Derek Scissors, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

Thursday, June 22
1:00 PM -2:15 PM
The Scientific American WorldView Super Session: Wrapping Up and Looking Forward
Join Scientific American Worldview and Nature Biotechnology for a discussion around the multiplicity of issues explored during the week’s programs and get a snapshot of future trends.
Moderator:
Andrew Marshall, Chief Editor, Nature Biotechnology
Panelist:
Susan Peschin, President and CEO, Alliance for Aging Research

Diverse #BIO2017 Super Sessions Cover Trump, Manufacturing, and the Future

Announced this week, BIO 2017’s Super Sessions offer compelling, topical and relevant discussions on topics ranging from what manufacturing strategy is best for producing new drugs to how Washington and the Trump administration may impact investment and trade to a debate about affordable access to innovative medicines. Beginning on Monday afternoon, the five, 75 minute sessions will run every day of the Convention with the last one appropriately focused on looking to the future.

For a complete breakdown of this year’s Super Sessions, visit mybio.org.
Highlights include:

Monday, June 19
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
So Many Choices: What’s the Right Bio-manufacturing Strategy for Me?
This panel will review the formidable challenges and decisions facing biopharma executives preparing to launch a new product.
Moderator:
S. Ann Montgomery, Editor-in-Chief, BioProcess International
Panelists:
Som Chattopadhyay, VP, Supply Chain, Amgen
Steve Lam, Senior VP, Biologics, Patheon
Matt Ottmer, COO, Momenta
Johannes Roebers, CEO, Cilatus BioPharma AG

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Dealmakers’ Intentions: 2017 Market Outlook
A highly distinguished panel of deal-makers will explore the impact market forces may have on pharmaceutical and biotech companies as they strive to make the next big deal.
Moderator:
Neel Patel, Managing Director, Commercial Strategy & Planning, inVentiv Health Consulting
Panelists:
Paul Biondi, Senior VP & Head, Business Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb
Doug Gioradano, Senior VP, Worldwide Business Development, Pfizer
Patrick Verheyen, Global Head, Janssen Business Development, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
Timothy P. Walbert Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Horizon Pharma

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Our Common Goal: Ensuring Access and Affordability of Innovative Medicines
This session will address the questions of how we ensure access and affordability of innovative medicines.
Moderator:
Ron Cohen, President and Chief Executive Officer, Acorda Therapeutics
Panelists:
Jeffrey Berkowitz, CEO, Optum International
Jeremy Levin, CEO & Chairman of the Board of Directors, Ovid Therapeutics
David Meeker, EVP and Head, Sanofi Genzyme
Steve Miller, SVP and Chief Medical Officer, Research and Clinical Sciences at Express Scripts, Inc.

Wednesday, June 21
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
The Trade and Investment Policies of the Trump Administration
This panel will focus on the Trump Administration’s trade and investment policies and their impact on the biotechnology industry.
Moderator:
Brian Pomper, Partner, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP
Speaker:
Derek Scissors, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

Thursday, June 22
1:00 PM -2:15 PM
The Scientific American WorldView Super Session: Wrapping Up and Looking Forward
Join Scientific American Worldview and Nature Biotechnology for a discussion around the multiplicity of issues explored during the week’s programs and get a snapshot of future trends.
Moderator:
Andrew Marshall, Chief Editor, Nature Biotechnology
Panelist:
Susan Peschin, President and CEO, Alliance for Aging Research