BIO World Congress Agenda Shows Industrial Biotech Diversifying, Differentiating, Disrupting, Disintermediating

This July, industrial biotech returns to its largest and grandest stage at the BIO World Congress, which convenes in Montreal on July 23rd through the 26th, and the plenary program offers convincing proof that the industry is diversifying fast into chemicals, nutrition, packaging, personal care, Every day, it is touching the consumer more and more directly in a shift away from pure bulk commodities and policy chat and into differentiated end-user product and packaging experiences that speak to customers whether they are looking for more sustainable products or novel performance.

Show me the Money

The pitch to Wall Street comes up first on July 24th when the World Congress opens the plenary program with “Why Bet on Renewables? Attracting Private Capital for Renewable Chemical Commercialization”. The investor panel features Brian Baynes, Partner, Flagship Pioneering William Byun, Principal, Conchubar Capital Advisory and Pavel Molchanov, Senior Vice President and Equity Analyst, Raymond James & Associates.

The Flava Brigade

But the pitch to Main Street will come quickly in view — and you’ll know it’s not your Dad’s industrial biotech when the focus shifts to “Biotech and the Future of Food Ingredients, Flavorings, and Personal Care” and the speakers include Andreas Birmoser, Senior Vice President Strategy and Business Development, Stora Enso Biomaterials, John Melo, President and Chief Executive Officer, Amyris , Markus Pompejus, Vice President White Biotechnology Research North America, BASF Corporation, and Jill Zullo, Vice President, Bioindustrials NA, Cargill.

The Fuel Disruptors

Fuels will be in evidence early on July 25th, but it’s all advanced technology and advances around the globe in “Second Generation Biofuels Poised for Big Wins,” with Pramod Chaudhari, Executive Chairman of Praj Industries Ltd., Marc Delcourt, Chief Executive Officer, Global Bioenergies, Jonas Markusson, Innovation and Product Development Manager, SEKAB, Hermann Pengg, Head of Renewable Fuels & Lifecycle Analysis Department, Audi AG, Mario Pennisi, Chief Executive Officer, Life Sciences Queensland, and Mena Salib, Manager of Aircraft Noise and Emissions, Air Canada.

Telling the Story

With product experiences more likely to touch the consumer through advantaged and differentiated brands, a new plenary session we’ve not seen before on the stage debuts on the 25th, “Effectively Communicating the Benefits of Industrial Biotechnology”, with Herman Betten, Global Head of Public Relations, DSM, Melody Bomgartner, Senior Business Editor, Chemical & Engineering News, Doris de Guzman, Senior Consultant – Bio-Materials, Tecnon OrbiChem USA, Stephan Herrera, Vice President, Strategy and Public Affairs, Evolva, and Sylvie Latieule, Director, Info Chimie Magazine.

Big Things Come in Sustainable Packages

The World Congress turns back to the the “Revolution in Biobased Products and Packaging” — a second plenary session on July 26th aimed at the emerging world of biomaterials and taking into account the changes in packaging. We’ll see Thijs Rodenburg, Chief Executive Officer, Rodenburg Biopolymers, Michael Saltzberg, Global Business Director, Biomaterials, DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Gustavo Sergi, Renewable Chemicals Business Director, Braskem, Puneet Trehan, Material Innovation and Development Leader, IKEA and Bob Walsh, Senior Vice President, Energy Sector, Intrexon.

Takeaways from the World Congress line-up this year?

First of all, it’s worth noting that there is hardly a speaker on stage whose organization is not multi-national in character or at least based entirely outside of North America. Industrial biotech is spreading around the globe and there’s a capital W in “World Congress” this year. Also worth noting that one-half of the plenary sessions take on renewable chemicals and biomaterials this year in some form — fuels are still in the foreground for many players — but the focus on materials and on products that more permanently sequester carbon is patently on view.

We also note the rise of big-budgeted major players and technologies in advanced states of technical readiness — there’s been quite a shift from the R to the D — players like Cargill, DuPont, DSM, IKEA, SEKAB, Air Canada, BASF, Stora Enso, and Braskem are clear evidence in the plenaries. Not to mention listed industrial biotech companies like Evolva, Intrexon and Global Bioenergies.

Finally, we note a shift away from the tradition of policymakers and consultants talking up the promise of industrial biotech and the opportunities they see for market access and decarbonizing the economy. The themes have changed from role-definition and roll-call to roll-out, roll-up. and roll-on — and that’s a potent and welcome sign of the times.

This article first appeared in Biofuels Digest, May 15, 2017 and is reprinted with permission, http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2017/05/15/bio-world-congress-agenda-shows-industrial-biotech-diversifying-differentiating-disrupting-disintermediating/.
©2017 Biofuels Digest. All rights reserved.

BIO World Congress Agenda Shows Industrial Biotech Diversifying, Differentiating, Disrupting, Disintermediating

This July, industrial biotech returns to its largest and grandest stage at the BIO World Congress, which convenes in Montreal on July 23rd through the 26th, and the plenary program offers convincing proof that the industry is diversifying fast into chemicals, nutrition, packaging, personal care, Every day, it is touching the consumer more and more directly in a shift away from pure bulk commodities and policy chat and into differentiated end-user product and packaging experiences that speak to customers whether they are looking for more sustainable products or novel performance.

Show me the Money

The pitch to Wall Street comes up first on July 24th when the World Congress opens the plenary program with “Why Bet on Renewables? Attracting Private Capital for Renewable Chemical Commercialization”. The investor panel features Brian Baynes, Partner, Flagship Pioneering William Byun, Principal, Conchubar Capital Advisory and Pavel Molchanov, Senior Vice President and Equity Analyst, Raymond James & Associates.

The Flava Brigade

But the pitch to Main Street will come quickly in view — and you’ll know it’s not your Dad’s industrial biotech when the focus shifts to “Biotech and the Future of Food Ingredients, Flavorings, and Personal Care” and the speakers include Andreas Birmoser, Senior Vice President Strategy and Business Development, Stora Enso Biomaterials, John Melo, President and Chief Executive Officer, Amyris , Markus Pompejus, Vice President White Biotechnology Research North America, BASF Corporation, and Jill Zullo, Vice President, Bioindustrials NA, Cargill.

The Fuel Disruptors

Fuels will be in evidence early on July 25th, but it’s all advanced technology and advances around the globe in “Second Generation Biofuels Poised for Big Wins,” with Pramod Chaudhari, Executive Chairman of Praj Industries Ltd., Marc Delcourt, Chief Executive Officer, Global Bioenergies, Jonas Markusson, Innovation and Product Development Manager, SEKAB, Hermann Pengg, Head of Renewable Fuels & Lifecycle Analysis Department, Audi AG, Mario Pennisi, Chief Executive Officer, Life Sciences Queensland, and Mena Salib, Manager of Aircraft Noise and Emissions, Air Canada.

Telling the Story

With product experiences more likely to touch the consumer through advantaged and differentiated brands, a new plenary session we’ve not seen before on the stage debuts on the 25th, “Effectively Communicating the Benefits of Industrial Biotechnology”, with Herman Betten, Global Head of Public Relations, DSM, Melody Bomgartner, Senior Business Editor, Chemical & Engineering News, Doris de Guzman, Senior Consultant – Bio-Materials, Tecnon OrbiChem USA, Stephan Herrera, Vice President, Strategy and Public Affairs, Evolva, and Sylvie Latieule, Director, Info Chimie Magazine.

Big Things Come in Sustainable Packages

The World Congress turns back to the the “Revolution in Biobased Products and Packaging” — a second plenary session on July 26th aimed at the emerging world of biomaterials and taking into account the changes in packaging. We’ll see Thijs Rodenburg, Chief Executive Officer, Rodenburg Biopolymers, Michael Saltzberg, Global Business Director, Biomaterials, DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Gustavo Sergi, Renewable Chemicals Business Director, Braskem, Puneet Trehan, Material Innovation and Development Leader, IKEA and Bob Walsh, Senior Vice President, Energy Sector, Intrexon.

Takeaways from the World Congress line-up this year?

First of all, it’s worth noting that there is hardly a speaker on stage whose organization is not multi-national in character or at least based entirely outside of North America. Industrial biotech is spreading around the globe and there’s a capital W in “World Congress” this year. Also worth noting that one-half of the plenary sessions take on renewable chemicals and biomaterials this year in some form — fuels are still in the foreground for many players — but the focus on materials and on products that more permanently sequester carbon is patently on view.

We also note the rise of big-budgeted major players and technologies in advanced states of technical readiness — there’s been quite a shift from the R to the D — players like Cargill, DuPont, DSM, IKEA, SEKAB, Air Canada, BASF, Stora Enso, and Braskem are clear evidence in the plenaries. Not to mention listed industrial biotech companies like Evolva, Intrexon and Global Bioenergies.

Finally, we note a shift away from the tradition of policymakers and consultants talking up the promise of industrial biotech and the opportunities they see for market access and decarbonizing the economy. The themes have changed from role-definition and roll-call to roll-out, roll-up. and roll-on — and that’s a potent and welcome sign of the times.

This article first appeared in Biofuels Digest, May 15, 2017 and is reprinted with permission, http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2017/05/15/bio-world-congress-agenda-shows-industrial-biotech-diversifying-differentiating-disrupting-disintermediating/.
©2017 Biofuels Digest. All rights reserved.

#BIO2017: A Peek at Pavilions | Sub-Saharan Africa

Breaking Buzz is BIO’s newest blog series that reaches across the globe to bring you an insider’s preview into the hottest international and partnering trends coming to San Diego for the BIO International Convention.

The Fastest-Growing Continent You Thought You Knew

The African continent is currently home to seven of the world’s top-ten fastest-growing economies; and by 2050 (just 33 years from today!) is projected to represent 26% of the global population.

Let that sink in for a minute.

There are 54 countries within the continent which spans more than 11.7 million square miles – second only to Asia both in percentage of land on earth, and population; it is home to over 1.2 billion people many of whom are now referred to as the world’s fastest-growing middle class. And get this: World Economics, a research organization that measures global economic activity, reports that the African continent has surpassed Europe and the Americas in real GDP growth when measuring by continent, from 1961 to 2015.

So what’s a continent to do with so much potential? Breaking Buzz asked Jennifer Dent, President of BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH) just that and she says, it all starts at the BIO International Convention.

“We brought in the first African delegation to the Convention from Nigeria in 2014. The next year, six countries came, and we had the first Africa Pavilion. Last year in San Francisco we had 16 African countries present. But this year in San Diego we will have 24 countries from the African continent and upward of 30 delegates – and for the record, these aren’t just any delegates. The delegates at the pavilion have real authority, so expect action.”

She is referring to Ministry of Health officials and advisors representing several countries, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, Côte d’Ivoire; and high-level decision makers from academic, non-profit organizations, and life science companies. Collectively they represent 24 of the African continent’s 54 countries and share a common mission: to engage biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and life science companies in meaningful initiatives, programs and partnerships to impact global health.

The quality of attendee is a direct reflection of recent findings reported by the World Bank who had this to say about Africa: Fostering public and private investment in infrastructure has become a priority to the African continent, [so] with well-targeted capital investments and policies fostering competitiveness and productivity, Africa’s larger and younger work force has the potential to transform the continent.

Jennifer Dent, President BVGH

“Think about what’s important to industry” says Dent; “they’re looking for growth opportunities in markets across the globe, and as the World Bank reveals, Africa has made considerable progress in its infrastructure development and emerging market status. While these countries have grown and prospered, however, so have non-communicable diseases like cancer and diabetes gown in prevalence; these aren’t just markets for anti-malarials and other anti-infectives anymore.”

To enter the African market, Dent stresses that partnerships will be critical to obtaining the in-depth knowledge of the continent’s infrastructure, politics, and disease landscape; that’s where the Convention comes into play and why she’ll be launching a new initiative in San Diego this year.

The African Access Initiative  will be launched on Wednesday at the BIO International Convention in San Diego; it is an integrated package of programs, activities, and partnerships designed to address the primary barriers to cancer treatment in Africa. The AAI will create new business models and tap into company products to establish access to cancer medicines and biologics. The program will augment the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer which is furthering research relating to cancers prevalent in Africa and facilitating and supporting training initiatives in oncology for health-care professionals. AAI will also support leading cancer researchers dedicated to building clinical trial networks, and determining how genetics affect the types of cancer prevalent to the area.

Two groups from Kenya, incubator Villgro Kenya, and the Kenya National Innovation Agency whose Chairman Professor Reuben Marwanga will also be present, are both working toward the development of a better ecosystem to support innovation and innovators in the country.

“That’s a lot,” says Dent enthusiastically, “and we have just scratched the surface. There are many milestones being reached in Africa, and taking it all in can be a challenge; which is why we’re presenting a one-hour media event at BIO to overview each of the 24 countries and their primary areas of therapeutics.”

Jim Greenwood, BIO President and long-time Africa advocate will open the event at 10:45 on Tuesday morning, the first full day of the Convention. Also in attendance will be the European Commission’s Deputy Head of Unit, Health Directorate Dr. Philippe Cupers who will introduce the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership.

The event will take place in the African Pavilion where you can visit 24 countries in one hour. No frequent flyer miles earned, but hey, what an efficient way to travel.

Filed under: Events, , , , , , , , , , , ,

#BIO2017: A Peek at Pavilions | Sub-Saharan Africa

Breaking Buzz is BIO’s newest blog series that reaches across the globe to bring you an insider’s preview into the hottest international and partnering trends coming to San Diego for the BIO International Convention.

The Fastest-Growing Continent You Thought You Knew

The African continent is currently home to seven of the world’s top-ten fastest-growing economies; and by 2050 (just 33 years from today!) is projected to represent 26% of the global population.

Let that sink in for a minute.

There are 54 countries within the continent which spans more than 11.7 million square miles – second only to Asia both in percentage of land on earth, and population; it is home to over 1.2 billion people many of whom are now referred to as the world’s fastest-growing middle class. And get this: World Economics, a research organization that measures global economic activity, reports that the African continent has surpassed Europe and the Americas in real GDP growth when measuring by continent, from 1961 to 2015.

So what’s a continent to do with so much potential? Breaking Buzz asked Jennifer Dent, President of BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH) just that and she says, it all starts at the BIO International Convention.

“We brought in the first African delegation to the Convention from Nigeria in 2014. The next year, six countries came, and we had the first Africa Pavilion. Last year in San Francisco we had 16 African countries present. But this year in San Diego we will have 24 countries from the African continent and upward of 30 delegates – and for the record, these aren’t just any delegates. The delegates at the pavilion have real authority, so expect action.”

She is referring to Ministry of Health officials and advisors representing several countries, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, Côte d’Ivoire; and high-level decision makers from academic, non-profit organizations, and life science companies. Collectively they represent 24 of the African continent’s 54 countries and share a common mission: to engage biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and life science companies in meaningful initiatives, programs and partnerships to impact global health.

The quality of attendee is a direct reflection of recent findings reported by the World Bank who had this to say about Africa: Fostering public and private investment in infrastructure has become a priority to the African continent, [so] with well-targeted capital investments and policies fostering competitiveness and productivity, Africa’s larger and younger work force has the potential to transform the continent.

Jennifer Dent, President BVGH

“Think about what’s important to industry” says Dent; “they’re looking for growth opportunities in markets across the globe, and as the World Bank reveals, Africa has made considerable progress in its infrastructure development and emerging market status. While these countries have grown and prospered, however, so have non-communicable diseases like cancer and diabetes gown in prevalence; these aren’t just markets for anti-malarials and other anti-infectives anymore.”

To enter the African market, Dent stresses that partnerships will be critical to obtaining the in-depth knowledge of the continent’s infrastructure, politics, and disease landscape; that’s where the Convention comes into play and why she’ll be launching a new initiative in San Diego this year.

The African Access Initiative  will be launched on Wednesday at the BIO International Convention in San Diego; it is an integrated package of programs, activities, and partnerships designed to address the primary barriers to cancer treatment in Africa. The AAI will create new business models and tap into company products to establish access to cancer medicines and biologics. The program will augment the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer which is furthering research relating to cancers prevalent in Africa and facilitating and supporting training initiatives in oncology for health-care professionals. AAI will also support leading cancer researchers dedicated to building clinical trial networks, and determining how genetics affect the types of cancer prevalent to the area.

Two groups from Kenya, incubator Villgro Kenya, and the Kenya National Innovation Agency whose Chairman Professor Reuben Marwanga will also be present, are both working toward the development of a better ecosystem to support innovation and innovators in the country.

“That’s a lot,” says Dent enthusiastically, “and we have just scratched the surface. There are many milestones being reached in Africa, and taking it all in can be a challenge; which is why we’re presenting a one-hour media event at BIO to overview each of the 24 countries and their primary areas of therapeutics.”

Jim Greenwood, BIO President and long-time Africa advocate will open the event at 10:45 on Tuesday morning, the first full day of the Convention. Also in attendance will be the European Commission’s Deputy Head of Unit, Health Directorate Dr. Philippe Cupers who will introduce the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership.

The event will take place in the African Pavilion where you can visit 24 countries in one hour. No frequent flyer miles earned, but hey, what an efficient way to travel.

Filed under: Events, , , , , , , , , , , ,

BIO 2017 Innovation Zone Company Snapshot: NuvOx Pharma

The next big medical breakthrough may start in a small business with a big idea. Recognizing the potential and promise of early-stage companies for addressing unmet medical needs, the BIO International Convention will once again host the Innovation Zone on the exhibit floor of the San Diego Convention Center, June 19-22. Eighty emerging companies will showcase biotechnology breakthroughs in drug discovery, diagnostics, and other therapeutic platform technologies.

The Innovation Zone was created through a partnership with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the intent to group Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-funded companies together on the exhibit floor of the BIO International Convention. The SBIR program provides U.S. federal funding to small businesses engaged in research and development with demonstrated potential for commercialization. Companies are rigorously vetted through the NIH and NSF SBIR review process prior to receiving the funding.

Today we spoke with Innovation Zone exhibitor, John McGonigle, Business Development Associate at NuvOx Pharma, which is supported by NIH’s SBIR program.

BTN: What is your company’s lead product or technology?
NuvOx Pharma is developing a nanotechnology platform of therapeutics to treat life-threatening diseases characterized by hypoxia. The Company has clinical programs in cancer (Phase II), stroke (Ib/II) and sickle cell disease (Phase Ib).

BTN: How has the NIH’s SBIR program helped your company grow?
The NIH’s SBIR program has been instrumental in the development of NuvOx Pharma. For example, our oncology program was started by an NCI SBIR Phase I grant to help us reformulate an EMEA approved ultrasound contrast agent as a stable emulsion for oxygen delivery.  A Phase II NCI SBIR grant supported IND enabling animal studies, and helped us show that the drug can raise tumor oxygen levels to make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. We completed a Phase Ib/II clinical trial in brain cancer, and the FDA has allowed our IND for a Phase II clinical trial in this indication. We have applied to the NIH for a Phase IIb SBIR Bridge Award, which would match investor funds to support the Phase II clinical trial. In addition, the Company has received Phase I SBIR/STTR grants to develop nanotechnology products for heart disease (endocarditis and myocardial infarction) and cancer (pancreas and breast).

BTN: What are the upcoming milestones and long-term priorities for your company?
Long term, we recognize that hypoxia can be life-threatening in many medical conditions, including some of the biggest killers in the world such as cancer, stroke and heart attack. We intend to save lives by using our nanotechnology to deliver oxygen to hypoxic tissue more effectively than red blood cells. We have animal data showing improved outcomes in cancer, stroke, myocardial infarction, sickle cell disease, hemorrhagic shock, and traumatic brain injury.

Short term, we have several major milestones coming up in the next year. We are on track to start the Phase II clinical trial in oncology this fall.  We have an active Phase Ib/II clinical trial in stroke and we should have the first randomized data from that trial within the year.  We are on track to start a Phase Ib clinical trial in sickle disease this summer.  The NHLBI has recently funded a study in heart attack in pigs, which could provide the data needed to file an IND for a clinical trial in that indication.

BTN: What do you hope to gain out of your participation at the 2017 BIO International Convention?
We are seeking investors to help us develop our drug assets and corporate partners to help us develop our nanotechnology products.

BTN: Tell us something about your company that investors might not know…
$100M was spent developing the core technology for a diagnostic indication – as an ultrasound contrast agent.  It was used in 2,200 patients, and approved in Europe, but never marketed due to competitive pressures. NuvOx was formed to reposition the technology for its oxygen delivery ability. We have devised new formulations with the support of the NIH.  We have tested the nanotechnology products in multiple models – oxygen delivery and/or therapeutic effect has been shown in 26 peer-reviewed publications, many of which were supported by NIH funding, in particular by the NCI and NHLBI.  We have expanded the IP – and have 5 patents issued, 1 patent allowed and 12 patents pending.  The FDA regulates the technology as a Biologic, allowing 12 years exclusivity for a first in class indication – and we are the only technology in clinical trials in our class.  We would like to thank the NIH for its forward-thinking and continued support.  Feel free to stop by NuvOx Pharma’s kiosk in the NIH’s Innovation Zone at BIO San Diego if you would like to learn more.

BIO 2017 Innovation Zone Company Snapshot: NuvOx Pharma

The next big medical breakthrough may start in a small business with a big idea. Recognizing the potential and promise of early-stage companies for addressing unmet medical needs, the BIO International Convention will once again host the Innovation Zone on the exhibit floor of the San Diego Convention Center, June 19-22. Eighty emerging companies will showcase biotechnology breakthroughs in drug discovery, diagnostics, and other therapeutic platform technologies.

The Innovation Zone was created through a partnership with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the intent to group Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-funded companies together on the exhibit floor of the BIO International Convention. The SBIR program provides U.S. federal funding to small businesses engaged in research and development with demonstrated potential for commercialization. Companies are rigorously vetted through the NIH and NSF SBIR review process prior to receiving the funding.

Today we spoke with Innovation Zone exhibitor, John McGonigle, Business Development Associate at NuvOx Pharma, which is supported by NIH’s SBIR program.

BTN: What is your company’s lead product or technology?
NuvOx Pharma is developing a nanotechnology platform of therapeutics to treat life-threatening diseases characterized by hypoxia. The Company has clinical programs in cancer (Phase II), stroke (Ib/II) and sickle cell disease (Phase Ib).

BTN: How has the NIH’s SBIR program helped your company grow?
The NIH’s SBIR program has been instrumental in the development of NuvOx Pharma. For example, our oncology program was started by an NCI SBIR Phase I grant to help us reformulate an EMEA approved ultrasound contrast agent as a stable emulsion for oxygen delivery.  A Phase II NCI SBIR grant supported IND enabling animal studies, and helped us show that the drug can raise tumor oxygen levels to make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. We completed a Phase Ib/II clinical trial in brain cancer, and the FDA has allowed our IND for a Phase II clinical trial in this indication. We have applied to the NIH for a Phase IIb SBIR Bridge Award, which would match investor funds to support the Phase II clinical trial. In addition, the Company has received Phase I SBIR/STTR grants to develop nanotechnology products for heart disease (endocarditis and myocardial infarction) and cancer (pancreas and breast).

BTN: What are the upcoming milestones and long-term priorities for your company?
Long term, we recognize that hypoxia can be life-threatening in many medical conditions, including some of the biggest killers in the world such as cancer, stroke and heart attack. We intend to save lives by using our nanotechnology to deliver oxygen to hypoxic tissue more effectively than red blood cells. We have animal data showing improved outcomes in cancer, stroke, myocardial infarction, sickle cell disease, hemorrhagic shock, and traumatic brain injury.

Short term, we have several major milestones coming up in the next year. We are on track to start the Phase II clinical trial in oncology this fall.  We have an active Phase Ib/II clinical trial in stroke and we should have the first randomized data from that trial within the year.  We are on track to start a Phase Ib clinical trial in sickle disease this summer.  The NHLBI has recently funded a study in heart attack in pigs, which could provide the data needed to file an IND for a clinical trial in that indication.

BTN: What do you hope to gain out of your participation at the 2017 BIO International Convention?
We are seeking investors to help us develop our drug assets and corporate partners to help us develop our nanotechnology products.

BTN: Tell us something about your company that investors might not know…
$100M was spent developing the core technology for a diagnostic indication – as an ultrasound contrast agent.  It was used in 2,200 patients, and approved in Europe, but never marketed due to competitive pressures. NuvOx was formed to reposition the technology for its oxygen delivery ability. We have devised new formulations with the support of the NIH.  We have tested the nanotechnology products in multiple models – oxygen delivery and/or therapeutic effect has been shown in 26 peer-reviewed publications, many of which were supported by NIH funding, in particular by the NCI and NHLBI.  We have expanded the IP – and have 5 patents issued, 1 patent allowed and 12 patents pending.  The FDA regulates the technology as a Biologic, allowing 12 years exclusivity for a first in class indication – and we are the only technology in clinical trials in our class.  We would like to thank the NIH for its forward-thinking and continued support.  Feel free to stop by NuvOx Pharma’s kiosk in the NIH’s Innovation Zone at BIO San Diego if you would like to learn more.

#BIO2017: A Peek at Partnering | SPARK

Breaking Buzz is BIO’s newest blog series that reaches across the globe to bring you an insider’s preview into the hottest international and partnering trends coming to San Diego for the BIO International Convention.

Perfecting Translation

Stanford’s translational research program, SPARK, is only 11 years old yet already has funded and supported 148 past and current projects, helped launch 24 start-ups and has had over 30 patents licensed. Spark lays claim to a 62% success rate; measured when a project enters into human clinical trials, or is licensed to a start-up or existing company.

With those kind of stats it’s no wonder Mahima Agochiya, Business Development and Program Manager for SPARK was besieged with meeting requests at last year’s BIO International Convention within BIO’s One-on-One Partnering™ system.

SPARK’s remarkable program – a partnership between Stanford and volunteers from the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and healthcare investment industries – offers support to an average of 12-15 new projects each year.

Mahima Agochiya PhD, MBA
Business Development and Program Manager
SPARK Translational Research Program at Stanford University School of Medicine

Breaking Buzz sat down with Mahima to chat about the 69 meetings she and her colleagues attended in three days during the BIO International Convention in San Francisco, and asked about her strategy for partnering success.

We know SPARK is a Translational Medicine Program based out of Stanford School of Medicine that seeks partnerships with industry to help translate its projects, and is entering into its second year attending BIO. What kind of partner are you looking for this year?

SPARK is agnostic to indication so we are not limited to specific areas of therapeutics. We generally look for companies that are interested in early stage start-up funding or licensing; or both. The assets/ projects that we are looking to partner with this year are novel, address an unmet clinical need, and are at a stage where they ready for the next step.

There are thousands of companies in the BIO’s One-on-One ™ system representing tens of thousands of assets. How did you narrow it down to 69 meetings?

The first thing I do is add filters. We are mostly interested in companies that license at early-stage since our projects are preclinical at the most, so my go-to filters are “licensing” and “early-stage” for example. I then send out a lot of meeting requests. Perhaps it was because last year was only the first year that SPARK attended BIO, and my first year too, but I was very surprised by the number of invitations we got from other companies. It helps a lot to belong to a university that has a great reputation scientifically and I think people were curious about us, given our success rate.

Can you tell us about that success rate?

SPARK has a 62% success rate on all projects we take in. So far we’ve spun out 24 start-ups; eight licenses to biopharma; four tech transfers without license, and 31 clinical trials – 10 without license. To date we have provided education, mentorship and funding to 148 projects and hundreds of students.

Last year SPARK had 35 projects (assets) that you presented during partnering meetings at the Convention. Did any of those materialize into a licensing opportunity?

Yes! Last year resulted in at least one successful partnership that I will be able to talk about at the Convention this June, and we have ongoing negotiations with other companies we met, most of whom we’ll meet with again in San Diego. BIO provides a great opportunity to get to know new companies and share experiences with them. I think it might be hard to walk away with nothing.

What’s your advice to people new to the Partnering system?

Don’t have a script ready. Instead, open with a clear and concise statement saying exactly what you’re looking for. A half-hour isn’t long enough to delve into details, but rather to quickly ascertain if there is a viable partnering opportunity; so keep the conversation direct at opening, then very flexible. Also, provide all of your materials on a USB. SPARK’s assets are detailed, each on a single page, in one file given on a single USB drive.

Besides partnering meetings, what else is on your Convention calendar?

On Monday from 11:30 – 4:30, SPARK will team up with partners from Massachusetts, Quebec, Philadelphia, San Francisco Bay Area, Oslo, UK Golden Triangle, Catalonia, and the Paris Region to present cutting edge innovations in oncology at the 6th International Cancer Cluster Showcase. Each cluster will present their oncology pipelines in compact 20-minute presentations, so it’s the perfect opportunity to learn about the latest innovations and a great precursor for partnering meetings on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.

Why did you get an MBA eight years after getting a PhD in cancer research?

The two degrees are actually a perfect combination. After finishing my PhD I did about eight years of basic science which was very rewarding, but also a little heartbreaking because I never saw the work translated. That’s what made me do the MBA – now I get to see all the cool science and get to see them translate – at Stanford University no less. How perfect is that?

Diverse #BIO2017 Super Sessions Cover Trump, Manufacturing, and the Future

Announced this week, BIO 2017’s Super Sessions offer compelling, topical and relevant discussions on topics ranging from what manufacturing strategy is best for producing new drugs to how Washington and the Trump administration may impact investment and trade to a debate about affordable access to innovative medicines. Beginning on Monday afternoon, the five, 75 minute sessions will run every day of the Convention with the last one appropriately focused on looking to the future.

For a complete breakdown of this year’s Super Sessions, visit mybio.org.
Highlights include:

Monday, June 19
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
So Many Choices: What’s the Right Bio-manufacturing Strategy for Me?
This panel will review the formidable challenges and decisions facing biopharma executives preparing to launch a new product.
Moderator:
S. Ann Montgomery, Editor-in-Chief, BioProcess International
Panelists:
Som Chattopadhyay, VP, Supply Chain, Amgen
Steve Lam, Senior VP, Biologics, Patheon
Matt Ottmer, COO, Momenta
Johannes Roebers, CEO, Cilatus BioPharma AG

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Dealmakers’ Intentions: 2017 Market Outlook
A highly distinguished panel of deal-makers will explore the impact market forces may have on pharmaceutical and biotech companies as they strive to make the next big deal.
Moderator:
Neel Patel, Managing Director, Commercial Strategy & Planning, inVentiv Health Consulting
Panelists:
Paul Biondi, Senior VP & Head, Business Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb
Doug Gioradano, Senior VP, Worldwide Business Development, Pfizer
Patrick Verheyen, Global Head, Janssen Business Development, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
Timothy P. Walbert Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Horizon Pharma

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Our Common Goal: Ensuring Access and Affordability of Innovative Medicines
This session will address the questions of how we ensure access and affordability of innovative medicines.
Moderator:
Ron Cohen, President and Chief Executive Officer, Acorda Therapeutics
Panelists:
Jeffrey Berkowitz, CEO, Optum International
Jeremy Levin, CEO & Chairman of the Board of Directors, Ovid Therapeutics
David Meeker, EVP and Head, Sanofi Genzyme
Steve Miller, SVP and Chief Medical Officer, Research and Clinical Sciences at Express Scripts, Inc.

Wednesday, June 21
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
The Trade and Investment Policies of the Trump Administration
This panel will focus on the Trump Administration’s trade and investment policies and their impact on the biotechnology industry.
Moderator:
Brian Pomper, Partner, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP
Speaker:
Derek Scissors, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

Thursday, June 22
1:00 PM -2:15 PM
The Scientific American WorldView Super Session: Wrapping Up and Looking Forward
Join Scientific American Worldview and Nature Biotechnology for a discussion around the multiplicity of issues explored during the week’s programs and get a snapshot of future trends.
Moderator:
Andrew Marshall, Chief Editor, Nature Biotechnology
Panelist:
Susan Peschin, President and CEO, Alliance for Aging Research

Diverse #BIO2017 Super Sessions Cover Trump, Manufacturing, and the Future

Announced this week, BIO 2017’s Super Sessions offer compelling, topical and relevant discussions on topics ranging from what manufacturing strategy is best for producing new drugs to how Washington and the Trump administration may impact investment and trade to a debate about affordable access to innovative medicines. Beginning on Monday afternoon, the five, 75 minute sessions will run every day of the Convention with the last one appropriately focused on looking to the future.

For a complete breakdown of this year’s Super Sessions, visit mybio.org.
Highlights include:

Monday, June 19
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
So Many Choices: What’s the Right Bio-manufacturing Strategy for Me?
This panel will review the formidable challenges and decisions facing biopharma executives preparing to launch a new product.
Moderator:
S. Ann Montgomery, Editor-in-Chief, BioProcess International
Panelists:
Som Chattopadhyay, VP, Supply Chain, Amgen
Steve Lam, Senior VP, Biologics, Patheon
Matt Ottmer, COO, Momenta
Johannes Roebers, CEO, Cilatus BioPharma AG

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Dealmakers’ Intentions: 2017 Market Outlook
A highly distinguished panel of deal-makers will explore the impact market forces may have on pharmaceutical and biotech companies as they strive to make the next big deal.
Moderator:
Neel Patel, Managing Director, Commercial Strategy & Planning, inVentiv Health Consulting
Panelists:
Paul Biondi, Senior VP & Head, Business Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb
Doug Gioradano, Senior VP, Worldwide Business Development, Pfizer
Patrick Verheyen, Global Head, Janssen Business Development, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
Timothy P. Walbert Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Horizon Pharma

Tuesday, June 20
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Our Common Goal: Ensuring Access and Affordability of Innovative Medicines
This session will address the questions of how we ensure access and affordability of innovative medicines.
Moderator:
Ron Cohen, President and Chief Executive Officer, Acorda Therapeutics
Panelists:
Jeffrey Berkowitz, CEO, Optum International
Jeremy Levin, CEO & Chairman of the Board of Directors, Ovid Therapeutics
David Meeker, EVP and Head, Sanofi Genzyme
Steve Miller, SVP and Chief Medical Officer, Research and Clinical Sciences at Express Scripts, Inc.

Wednesday, June 21
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
The Trade and Investment Policies of the Trump Administration
This panel will focus on the Trump Administration’s trade and investment policies and their impact on the biotechnology industry.
Moderator:
Brian Pomper, Partner, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP
Speaker:
Derek Scissors, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

Thursday, June 22
1:00 PM -2:15 PM
The Scientific American WorldView Super Session: Wrapping Up and Looking Forward
Join Scientific American Worldview and Nature Biotechnology for a discussion around the multiplicity of issues explored during the week’s programs and get a snapshot of future trends.
Moderator:
Andrew Marshall, Chief Editor, Nature Biotechnology
Panelist:
Susan Peschin, President and CEO, Alliance for Aging Research

#BIO2017: A Peek at Pavilions | FRANCE

Breaking Buzz is BIO’s newest blog series that reaches across the globe to bring you an insider’s preview into the hottest international and partnering trends coming to San Diego for the BIO International Convention.

To France, You Are Family

Pierre Goffaux and his fellow Business France executive Charles-Henry Dion exude a certain, how shall we say – savoir-faire, as they engaged in a conversation recently about their plans for the 4,000 square foot French Pavilion they will be hosting at the BIO International Convention in June.  The hour-long tete-a-tete, which could have easily gone on longer due to the Messrs.’ depth of understanding about their country’s global and partnering intentions, shed important light on how France will stand out in San Diego.

But first things first: French wine and cheese.

“On Sunday evening, before the craziness and excitement of BIO begins, we are inviting everyone at BIO to an informal reception hosted by Business France,” invites Mr. Dion. “The idea is to not only give a very brief overview of France’s seven biotech clusters by identifying their different therapeutic areas of specialty, but also to enjoy some French wines, cheeses, and pâtisserie in a relaxed environment.”  The event will be held at El Camino Real and bus shuttles will be provided from the convention center.

This will be Business France’s tenth year hosting a BIO International Pavilion. “We want the pavilion to genuinely represent France – and to do that we have expanded the exhibit space into a more mixed model,” explains Mr. Dion. “In previous years our pavilion was dedicated to the different French clusters, and although that is still the case, this year’s clusters will include small or start-up resident companies that present some of the successful work being accomplished in a particular region.”

The pavilion will also be host to two established French companies: Genosafe and Yposkesi along with Pact & Partners, a leading global executive search firm dedicated to life sciences.

“Business France exists to optimize the presence of everybody. We are open to all companies – from the smallest start up to some of the biggest names in therapeutics. In that respect we are a family and our updated exhibit model now reflects that sentiment.” You don’t have to be French to be in the family, however—the country’s extraordinary tax credits for R&D enable a company of any nationality, even with only one employee in France, to become eligible for a corporate tax reduction of 30% of R&D spending up to €100 million, and 5% on anything over that. So far roughly 16,000 companies have enjoyed the tax credit, which is largely considered the best in the world, representing a cumulative €6 billion.

Hefty incentives for innovation in R&D also exist by way of JEI, designed to assist innovative SMEs and new companies in need of immediate research tax credits. To acquire the JEI status and learn more click here.

Charles-Henry Dion, Senior Manager, North American Biotech & Healthcare Department

“Family” describes well the tone set by Mssrs. Dion and Goffaux as they eagerly explain their plans for the Convention, which include a presentation on Wednesday at 11:45 in the Global Innovation Hub, and, at informal gatherings with Australia, Brazil, and Canada.

Business France sees great opportunities in Australia, where together with AusBiotech, they will co-host a webinar in May that will help French companies better understand the Australian life sciences market and its business opportunities. The webinar also aims to introduce both national delegations before the convention in order to generate further partnering meetings and networking.

Biotech in Brazil has become a top priority since that country’s recent legislative changes. Business France was quick to respond to their colleagues in San Paulo when asked to discuss partnering opportunities. Together, they have organized a social hour for companies from each region to meet for a relaxed chat at the French pavilion.

Pierre Goffaux, Project Manager, Biotech & Healthcare Department

As for Canada, Mr. Dion has this to say: “There is a tight bond between France and Canada, especially with Québec. But beyond that there are many business and educational exchanges including the recent partnership between our Lyon and Montreal clusters.” The two have agreed to join forces in order to provide enhanced support to companies seeking to expand on both sides of the Atlantic, with a full immersion in the local ecosystem, including support, a personalized course of action, and office space.

The pièce de résistance? As is true for all of the events hosted by Business France during the BIO International Convention, everyone, from the intimate gatherings with specific countries, to the Welcome Reception on Sunday night, is invited. And, yes, bring your willpower (or not!) because in addition to meeting and conversing, you will be tempted to indulge some of France’s finest délicatesses.