6 key facts on antibiotic resistance

Rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance worries researchers spanning the globe as antibiotic-resistant infections impact millions of people every year, according to CDC data.

Here are six key facts:

1. Estimates find such infections cause nearly 2.05 million illnesses every year.

2. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria result in 23,000 deaths annually.

3. CDC estimates find Clostridium difficile contributes to 250,000 illnesses and 14,000 deaths.

4. In March 2017, the World Health Organization compiled a list of antibiotic-resistant pathogens it deemed a priority. WHO named the following three pathogens as the highest priority:
●    Acinetobacter baumannii, carbapenem-resistant
●    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, carbapenem-resistant
●    Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant, ESBL-producing

5. Overprescribing antibiotics is a major concern to medical professionals as this practice drives the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. The American Psychological Association published two studies finding physicians are more prone to prescribe antibiotics if a patient has high expectations

6. Jeffrey A. Linder, MD, associate professor of medicine in the general internal medicine division at Boston-based Brigham and Women’s Hospital, gave the following strategies to limit antibiotic prescribing:
●    Put up information which give staff members information about antibiotics’ side effects and why they may not be effective when fighting viral infections
●    Peer comparison
●    Have alerts on EHR systems if a provider tries to order an antibiotic not typically indicated for that diagnosis
●    Have providers justify their order for antibiotics

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WHO plans to slash medication-related harm by 50% in 5 years: 4 things to note

The World Health Organization implemented a global initiative, the Global Patient Safety Challenge on Medication Safe, aimed at reducing avoidable medication-associated harm by 50 percent over the next five years, according to News-Medical.

Here are four things to note:

1. The initiative will identify health systems’ inefficiencies that result in medication errors.

2. WHO’s Global Patient Safety Challenge on Medication Safety will provide ways to improve how providers prescribe medication as well as how patients consume medications.

3. The plan also seeks to bolster patient awareness on improper medication use risks.

4. News-Medical reports that Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO director-general, said,  “We all expect to be helped, not harmed, when we take medication,” said. “Apart from the human cost, medication errors place an enormous and unnecessary strain on health budgets. Preventing errors saves money and saves lives.”

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Stryker releases SurgiCount Tablet to safely track surgical sponges: 5 key notes

Kalamazoo, Mich.-based Stryker released its SurgiCount Tablet, a touch-screen interface for its SurgiCount Safety-Sponge System.

Here’s what you should know.

1. The interface offers extended capabilities to track individual sponges and towels used in surgery to reduce the risk of retained sponges.

2. Retained surgical items are the highest reported “never event,” with 69 percent of all retained surgical items being surgical sponges.

3. Analysts estimate providers leave 11 surgical sponges in patients on a daily basis in the United States. Those preventable events add $2.4 billion to the healthcare system.

4. The SurgiCount system identifies sponges and towels, and provides a precise, real-time count to the surgical team during a procedure.

5. The tablet has a 10-inch display with touch screen controls. It can be both pole or wall-mounted and has a slip-in battery slot for continuous operation. The tablet also has Wi-Fi capabilities and allows for secure data transfer using SurgiCount 360 software.

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7 facts on patient falls

Healthcare facilities around the country are implementing different protocols to limit the number of patient falls, which may result in injury and readmission.

Here are seven facts on patient falls based on 2015 The Joint Commission data:

1. Hundreds of thousands of patients fall in U.S. hospitals every year.

2. Of these falls, between 30 percent and 50 percent result in patient injury.

3. One study found a single fall added nearly 6.3 days to a patient’s hospital stay.

4. The average cost for a fall-related injury is $14,000.

5. Various factors led to patient falls, including:

•    Insufficient leadership
•    Deficiencies in the physical environment
•    Communication failures
•    Insufficient assessment
•    A lapse in staff orientation, supervision, staffing levels or skill mix

6. The Joint Commission recommends organizations launch an initiative aimed at increasing fall prevention, implement an interdisciplinary falls injury
prevention team as well as utilize a standardized, validated tool to identify risk factors for falls, among other recommendations.

7. The ASC Collaboration found the average patient fall rate in the ASC setting was 0.124 per 1,000 admissions for the four quarter of 2016.

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WHO: 12 highest priority superbugs

The World Health Organization compiled a list of antibiotic-resistant pathogens it deemed a priority on March 20, 2017, according to The Washington Post.

The organization formulated the list based on the severity of the threat they posed to human health.

Here are the following 12 pathogens, beginning with the highest priority.

Priority 1: Critical

1. Acinetobacter baumannii, carbapenem-resistant
2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, carbapenem-resistant
3. Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant, ESBL-producing

Priority 2: High

4. Enterococcus faecium, vancomycin-resistant
5. Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant, vancomycin-intermediate and resistant
6. Helicobacter pylori, clarithromycin-resistant
7. Campylobacter spp., fluoroquinolone-resistant
8. Salmonellae, fluoroquinolone-resistant
9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, cephalosporin-resistant, fluoroquinolone-resistant

Priority 3: Medium

10. Streptococcus pneumoniae, penicillin-non-susceptible
11. Haemophilus influenzae, ampicillin-resistant
12. Shigella spp., fluoroquinolone-resistant

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Physicians rank most prestigious diseases

Norwegian physicians weighed in on the diseases they deemed most prestigious in three surveys conducted in 1990, 2002 and 2014, according to New York Magazine.

Social Science & Medicine published a paper that found results were consistent across the years when physicians ranked 38 categories of disease on a prestige scale from one to nine.

The diseases varied in placement across the surveys.

The top prestigious diseases across all three surveys include:
●    Leukemia
●    Brain tumors
●    Myocardial infarctions

The least prestigious diseases include:
●    Fibromyalgia
●    Depression
●    Anxiety
●    Cirrhosis of the liver

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