10+ orthopedic products from AAOS 2019 you need to know

Attendees line up to register for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons annual meeting in Las Vegas this week. More than 30,000 people were expected. (Image from AAOS)

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting in Las Vegas is abuzz about robotics, according to industry analysts from SVB Leerink.

While the SVB Leerink analysts termed Stryker’s  (NYSE:SYK) Mako platform “best-in-class,” it’s an expanding category. Other major orthopedics companies are using this week’s AAOS meeting to introduce new offerings or tout updates to existing ones.

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ), for example, said it plans to debut its Orthotaxy total knee system in 2020, with spine, hip and eventually shoulder indications likely to follow. J&J bought the French robot-assisted surgery startup in 2018, and didn’t have any photos of the prototype to share. But the analysts said it attaches to the patient table and includes a saw/bone cutting capability, like Mako. Unlike Mako, it will not have haptic capability. Rather, it gets the surgeon locked into a cutting plane and preserves the surgeon’s control of the saw (side to side and front to back) on that plane.

Get the full story on our sister site, Medical Design & Outsourcing.

 

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CT scans may catch more low bone density sufferers before spine surgery

spine surgery

[Photo by Joyce McCown on Unsplash]

A CT scan before spine surgery turned up a significant number of patients with previously undiagnosed low bone density, according to a new study out of Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.

The study, presented yesterday at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, suggests there may be value in prospective lumbar, or lower, spine patients first receiving a CT scan in the area.

Get the full story from our sister site Medical Design & Outsourcing. 

 

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